Long Range Rifle Shooting on a budget ...

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Rogue Rider, Feb 11, 2019.


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  1. Rogue Rider

    Rogue Rider Well-Known Member

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    Not everyone out there has thousands of dollars to spend on getting themselves a good Long Range Shooting Rifle Setup.
    Here are some suggestions :
    1. Have an idea of how much you can afford to spend on your initial setup ... Rifle, Scope , Ammunition, a rest, bags or bi-pod to start with, you can always add to it as you go.
    Don't spend more for your scope than you will for your Rifle . You can always upgrade your scope later.
    2. Choose a Range that you can reasonably achieve at first then move out as you get better.
    3. Choose a Caliber that will suit your needs.
    4. Compare prices, warranties and available accessories from the different Rifle Companies.
    5. When choosing a Rifle compare the features that you get for the price your paying.
    6. When you're looking at Rifles stay in your price range, . some of the more affordable Rifles out there are made by very reputable Firearms Companies that have been around for a while ... Remington, .Ruger and Savage to name a few.
    7. Long Range Shooting should be challenging and fun. Don't try to base your experience on what someone else says they can do ... enjoy reaching your own goals.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019
  2. Rogue Rider

    Rogue Rider Well-Known Member

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    There's a lot of good advise from experienced shooter's and gun enthusiasts on these forums .
     
  3. Bravo 4

    Bravo 4 Well-Known Member

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    I didn’t know there were two 2’s in the alphabet. :D:D:D
     
  4. L.Sherm

    L.Sherm Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    I dont agree with the first 2, doesnt do you any good if your scope doesnt hold zero or track right. You can always upgrade barrel or stock on a factory rifle
     
  5. KyCarl

    KyCarl Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    I pretty much agree except for the first number two! Get a Good scope right off!
    Lower priced optics usually don't preform like you want and you never get close to your money back! You just end up buying 2 scopes when one would have been enough!
     
  6. Pmacc60

    Pmacc60 Well-Known Member

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    I think the best advice you have is number 7. To high of expectations on yourself or your equipment will have you become frustrated. There are many great shooters who have incredable talent, many are her on this site but for every one that is that good there are a hundred BS artists .
    A young shooter will tell you that lesser rifles and scopes can do the job that the better stuff can, the older shooter will tell you to get results you want you need to spend money. Rifles and factory ammo are so much better than they were forty years ago when I started this passion for performance. I think I’m mho that the triggers on factory rifles are responsible for a lot of this, however reaching out to be consistent at long range you need to start spending the green.
    Where I disagree with you most is when it comes to glass ! Buy the most quality you can afford when it comes to optics! Not the most magnification but quality . Aim small miss small is one of those stupid movie lines that is true and you need good glass to see at distance. There is no one competing anywhere with cheap glass . Sorry to say but it’s the brutal truth.
    That all being said here would be my thoughts on getting started. Online and in gun shops there are scores of good high quality rifles for sale that have been hardly shot. The previous owners though it was a good idea to buy it but it forwhatever reason they got rid of it. There is good value there. I know because I’ve bought many of them. April through July is the best time to find a deal. I have purchased several rifles at this time of the year for half the cost I thought I would have to pay.
    Buy good quality scopes used, the better manufactures have great warranties that transfer to the new owner. I buy some great scopes at savings of hundreds of dollars .
    Lastly become a hand loader , you can’t practice with factory ammo no matter how good it is because of cost and the only way to shoot well is to practice!
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2019
  7. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    Establishing reasonable budget remains "my" #1 driving factor, and that's where the process starts for me. Often followed by components research/acquisition with DIY or gunsmith build considerations . Scope is normally the last item to purchase. With regards to range, it comes later and does not happen overnight - practice, practice, practice.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019
  8. therifleman556

    therifleman556 Well-Known Member

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    Also disagree with #2. Scope should cost at least as much as the rifle. I sell and trade rifles all the time; very rarely will I part with a good optic unless I've genuinely no use for it and need the cash to upgrade.
     
  9. Creedmoor shooter

    Creedmoor shooter Well-Known Member

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    I guess it depends how much the rifle costs for the cost of the scope. In general I'll spend no less than 5-600 if it's going on just a hunting rifle. When we add long range to it then it becomes a different ball game. My last scope cost me $1,000 which is still cheap compared to what other folks get. After owning good glass you'll never ever go back to cheap glass. I'd rather spend 500 on a rifle and 1000 on glass than 1000 on the rifle and 500 on glass.
     
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  10. Canhunter35

    Canhunter35 Well-Known Member

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    I disagree, don’t ever add up how much you’ve spent...ever. Lol
    The simplest way to get into lr is buy a rifle designed for lr. Free floated heavy barrel as the main prerequisite.
    I have a mark 4 sitting on a 22 right now, I also disagree about the scope, but it’s not cost, it’s just quality tracking I’m after.
     
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  11. Bravo 4

    Bravo 4 Well-Known Member

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    Since we are being serious, I guess I can too.
    I’m with the others who say buy the best scope you can afford. Best as in tracking, repeatablity, dependability and glass. Cost is one of the biggest factors in anything but it doesn’t necessarily need to be based off the price of the rifle. I have a rifle that cost several thousand dollars, it doesn’t have a scope on it that cost near that. Nobody I’ve ever met would question that scope.
    If on a budget start looking in the classifieds, hold out for sales, or use a military/LE discount if you have that option. I have done all three.
     
  12. SHOOTMORE

    SHOOTMORE New Member

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    Cpl Austin, Fine job. The words "Long Range" and "Budget" mean different things to each of us. Hard to cover it all in a short paragraph.
     
  13. Rogue Rider

    Rogue Rider Well-Known Member

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    Thank you, this is exactly the right way to approach what this topic is about, the key word here is Budget.
    After seeing some of the responses about focusing on the scope first instead of the Rifle is like the old adage of " putting the cart before the horse "
    Although the importance of good Optics can not be underestimated, We will get into the reasoning of Emphasis of the Rifle over the Optics.
     
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  14. Rogue Rider

    Rogue Rider Well-Known Member

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    Thank you, It's good to remember that my goal here is to offer suggestions on this Topic and to let the reader find what works for them, your exactly right "Long Range and Budget" mean different things to different people.