Hot Tent... Is it Necessary

Discussion in 'Backpacking Gear & Clothing' started by BUSTINDOGS, Jan 15, 2018.

  1. BUSTINDOGS

    BUSTINDOGS Well-Known Member

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    I have never camped in the winter before and I'm looking to start getting some gear together to spend a night out in the cold.
    First thought was hot tent for sure no questions, but after reading a few forums I started wondering how cold of a night can a guy take without a stove?
    My goal is to have a system that is light enough to pack it all in and stay a night or two.
    I was looking into the Seek outside tipi tents with their stoves.
    Any advice is welcomed. I hope to be able to have most of the gear I will need so I can test it yet this cold season.
     
  2. RandyinVa

    RandyinVa Well-Known Member

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    Break Back Mountain!
     
  3. BUSTINDOGS

    BUSTINDOGS Well-Known Member

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    Body heat is nice... but I don't think I could convince my hunting buddies.
     
  4. RandyinVa

    RandyinVa Well-Known Member

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    i am on the wrong side for big game hunts and would love o have your problem.
     
  5. BUSTINDOGS

    BUSTINDOGS Well-Known Member

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    It's only distance I'm 900 miles one way to the hunting grounds
     
  6. middleofnowhere

    middleofnowhere Well-Known Member

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    Mountaineers do extremely cold camping without stoves. If you are in your bag, and don’t mind being confined, you can handle any cold. A good layering system will allow you to shed and add warmth as needed.

    I have done sub zero cold for short periods and have never used a wood stove. I am usually pretty active and not hanging out in a tent.

    The Seek stuff seems pretty good, i am looking at getting one of their TeePees through a backcountry hunters and anglers membership.
     
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  7. dmj

    dmj Well-Known Member

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    The seeking outside tipi work quite well. I assume you are thinking of getting a titanium wood stove to go with this. While they don't hold a fire for along time they do put out quite a bit of heat. These tipi do seem to sweat pretty bad. So I would advise getting the liner. Good luck and have fun.
     
  8. lesvoth

    lesvoth Active Member

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    Some folks may not consider this camping, but I trucked over the road for 35 years. Because of a bad bout with A/C in 1987, I could not use it in a truck, car or house again. One whiff and I was sick for a month. I ran all across the south, too, Georgia to California, summer and winter.

    BUT, because I owned my own trucks and didn't want to spend money, I rarely let them run. I have slept in trucks without a heat source down to -6. My last truck was a 1996 Freightliner and the top of the sleeper separated from the walls. The glue died, I guess. The guy I sold it to last year said he could stick his arm into the sleeper from the outside through the gap. Said I was the most tolerant guy he knew.

    So, I basically slept outside for my last five years on the road. My rule was that I would shut off the truck if it was 20 degrees or warmer. Sometimes I shut it off at ten degrees if I wasn't going to sleep long.

    What did I use to stay warm in the end? I had an old sleeping bag that someone gave me about 15 years ago. I unzipped it and used it as a single layer along with a $14 Dacron blanket I bought a Walmart in 2007. I used the Dacron one by itself most of the time, but in the winter I used both.

    The big thing is keeping the cold from getting underneath you. My wore out matress wasn't much, so I would put a couple of old parkas under it to seal the cold out from under me.

    And wear a warm hat and socks. You'll make it. Thirty-five years of feeding you'all says so!
     
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  9. BUSTINDOGS

    BUSTINDOGS Well-Known Member

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    I think for the sake of comfort I will get a stove sure would be nice to cook a hot meal inside of the tent especially if its raining or snowing out.

    What's everyone's thoughts on a sleep system? Whats a good pad that's light and will keep you warm. Whats a good sleeping bag. Mostly interested in what features these should have but if you have a specific one you use that good too.

    Do you wear your base layers, heavy socks, hat, and gloves while you sleep?
     
  10. dmj

    dmj Well-Known Member

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    For a sleeping mat I use a(can't remember the name for sure. Expo or something like that). Got it from Cabela's and it's a down filled mat that you add air to, weights about 2 lbs. I've never camped where you were setting up on snow pack. But have camped in cold weather and where it has snowed a couple feet while there. And the side of you next to the mat is always nice and warm. Yes I take sleeping clothes with me. They consist of a clean heavy pair of wool socks, a top and bottom of Merino wool, and a stocking hat. Of course I always have a puffy in my pack. This seems to work for me. But understand most of my camping is done when the temperature is above the zero mark. Good luck
     
  11. lesvoth

    lesvoth Active Member

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    dmj mentions the inflatable mat. That is an excellent idea. Anything to keep you off the ground comfortably is bonus.

    A trucking friend of mine bought a product called "tekfoil" for a specific purpose, but had to buy about 120 feet of it where he was at the time. Over the next few years he was putting the tekfoil into any space he decided needed insulation. Under the floor mats in his truck and van. Inside the door panels on every vehicle he had. He was a most agressive sales guy for this stuff.

    It doesn't take up any space and is as light as a couple of sheets of tinfoil - just better.

    If I was camping in the winter I think some of this under your tent floor, and particularly under your bed, would reflect all your heat back toward you.

    teksupply.com is the online source. Amazing stuff with many uses.
     
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  12. middleofnowhere

    middleofnowhere Well-Known Member

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    I use a thermarest https://www.thermarest.com/mattresses/neoair-xtherm
    For sleep I use a quilt (enlightened equipment) but also have a down bag from REI for cold.
    This last season i went to a tarp set-up, no floor so I used a piece of Tyvek like they use in house construction.
     
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  13. Alex Wheeler

    Alex Wheeler Well-Known Member

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    Hot tents are for when your awake. Those little stoves need feeding constantly. I winter camp for fun and the stove is out about an hour after you fall asleep.
     
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  14. BUSTINDOGS

    BUSTINDOGS Well-Known Member

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    If you were going in for 2-3 nights while hunting late November in SW MT. would you bring your stove?