Get your knees ready for a horseback hunt

Discussion in 'Physical Training For Mountain Hunting And Backpac' started by Andy Backus, Nov 15, 2017.


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  1. Don A Parsons

    Don A Parsons Well-Known Member

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    You need to drink more beer, Ha. Just kidding,,, great idea fore sure, thanks for sharing.

    Yes, get out there and get moving, I try to stretch everything in the body through out the day,,, the tasks at work allows for this as we try different ways to work each group of mussels with different habits .

    Dr Hamilton Hall is the back doctor dude,,, if a person follows his ideas on working our back / spine,,, then relate this ideas to other parts of our worn down body's ,,, "hopefully" we can continue to reap the rewards of good times for a few more years.

    I fear it's to late to start working my noodle. Ha

    Deffinatly poor performance in that sector.
     
  2. Ricky C

    Ricky C Member

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    Feb 12, 2019
    Hey,

    I'm going on my first horse back hunt this fall in Idaho. Always dreamed of a horse back as a kid, the problem is I really don't like horses much. Had some bad experiences with them as a teenager working on a farm. I am really looking forward to the hunt. So this thread has been helpful. I plan on trying to go riding a couple times before the hunt to kind of get prepped for this. Thanks for all the info.

    Take Care, Rick
     
  3. Rick Richard

    Rick Richard Well-Known Member

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    I can relate to this experience or discomfort. When hunting the Thorofare region of Wyoming, it takes us about 9 hours riding in or out and that is on a good day. And, about two days to get my legs back.
     
  4. Antonio m

    Antonio m Well-Known Member

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    Luckily, I have never had knee issues and I ride nearly daily. I also ride in an oxbow . Oxbow stirrups are narrow and fit deep into you boot, resting on your boot heel.
    This allows better alignment and you will sit straighter, it also allows the stirrup leathers to swing more freely .
    You won't see this much unless you punch cows and in a stock saddle , dawn to dusk.
    The downside- it is tougher to get in and out of , they are made for staying in . It will help reduce the stress on a riders knees, however...
    just a thought.
     
  5. Hand Skills

    Hand Skills Well-Known Member

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    I've found cycling to be an excellent cross-training activity when preparing for a couple of weeks in the saddle. This not only strengthens every muscle connected to the knee, it helps develop core strength and balance, which are both hugely important in the steep country.

    It's no coincidence that 'saddle' is the proper term for a bike seat as well :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2019
    sedancowboy likes this.
  6. Antonio m

    Antonio m Well-Known Member

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    I agree, cycling would be excellent.A hunter going on a pack trip had better do some form of leg strengthening and cardio work. Mountains are steep and once afoot he will be glad he did.
    I keep fit during the wintertime and if I didn't I would not be able to do this....at 61
     
  7. Clem Bronkoski

    Clem Bronkoski Well-Known Member

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    Jun 23, 2019
    Having been on a few horseback hunts myself I'm sure you can attest to this. Make every attempt to be the lead horse of just behind the guide whenever possible. Especially when riding up a steep slope. Those trail horses like to "kick in the after burners" going up hill and its best to be in front of most of them.
     
  8. Lethal_Chica

    Lethal_Chica Active Member

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    Oct 30, 2018
    I wish I had seen this thread this summer. I just finished my first elk horseback trip in the mountains of Wyoming and god did my right knee hurt from riding. My rear end never hurt once, which I attribute to countless hours on a spin bike the last couple years. When I go again next year, I am definitely going to try some of the stretches and strength exercises everyone here recommends.