Colorado OTC rifle

Discussion in 'Elk Hunting' started by bretterath, May 18, 2014.

  1. bretterath

    bretterath Well-Known Member

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    Mar 14, 2011
    Planning on a elk hunt in colorado OTC looking at unit 421 has anyone ever hunted the area or have any advice, I would be backpacking in trying to stay away from people and the atv's trails. I'm not set on unit 421 just looking into that unit would take any advice on any OTC unit for rifle. I want to try to find an area where would have a chance at harvesting my first elk not looking for something huge just want some experience and try to harvest first bull. Thanks for your time guys.
     
  2. T3-OleMan

    T3-OleMan Well-Known Member

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    Jan 3, 2009
    Never been to area 421 but I will be going to the SAN JUAN N.F. for the 21st time this year and I will pass one bit of advice to any one going to CO for elk. If I don't get drawn for 1st rifle I will wait as long as I can to decide on 2nd or 3rd rifle and the amount of DEEP SNOW at and above my hunting spots will determine which I pick. Snow at 9K-10K is your friend (even if you hunt at 7K-8k) ! I like to go 3rd rifle if there is not a good amount of snow before 1st rifle season.
    Good luck, hope you get a big'un.
     
  3. County Hand

    County Hand New Member

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    Sep 21, 2014
    Planning in doing a 3rd season hunt. Complete rookie and never seen a mountain lol

    Any tips. To help out. ?
     
  4. Bravo 4

    Bravo 4 Well-Known Member

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    Not from Colorado but will give you a tip from an out of state DIY guy, get maps of the area(s) you plan on hunting and use a GPS...and know where you are in conjunction to private/public land borders! It can be a maze. I got my topo maps from Colorado Parks and Wildlife. The wildlife officer that stopped me to check my last elk made it a point that they make it so bad for trespassing (even accidental) that you will never want to come back to their state and hunt if you ever get caught. Add to that the land owner can make you pay for his fee to kill an animal on his property and it can be an astounding amount of money. Plus if you shoot an animal and it crosses onto private land the land owner may not let you recover it. If you shoot one and it crosses over to private you should call the CPW and ask for their assistance with the landowner. Keep in mind the officer I spoke with said you had better be able to prove you shot it on public and it crossed over.
     
  5. predator 22

    predator 22 Well-Known Member

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    Get in good shape! And when you think you are ready get in better shape. I live in SW Colorado and see a lot of out of state hunters come here with the intention of getting off the road and doing some serious hiking but when they get here and start up the mountain the first half mile they are out breath headed back to the truck to do some road hunting. Illegal by the way. Get in shape and come a few days early to get use to the altitude get a GPS because if you haven't seen mountains before they can be intimidating and hunt with a friend (trust me packing a elk with two people is always nicer) and good luck.
     
  6. jonthomps

    jonthomps Well-Known Member

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    ^^^ This! Get there a couple days early and walk/exercise/jog to get used to the altitude.
     
  7. County Hand

    County Hand New Member

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    I wish I could get there a couple days early. Unfortunately the earliest I can get there will be the day before. Next year will be a different story !!
    Been jogging and running bleachers here in Tx. I KNOW it's not gonna get me to where I need to be for the altitude but every bit will help overall I think.
    I've loaded my pack down with 40 pounds and been toting that the last week. Will be bumping the weight up 10-15 pounds a week until we pull out.
     
  8. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    This needs to be repeated as I got reminded on my trip with Mario. I grew up bouncing around those montains like a Billy Goat and have handled a lot of tough terrain at high elevations throughout my life. It had however been nearly ten years since I'd hunted above 6,000' and the first day out flat kicked my *** and stomped me like a mule on a stray dog.

    The best advice I can give anyone going up to such elevations is to plan if at all possible a camping trip or two in the months prior where you can stay for at least three days of hard hiking with a load during the days and rest well at night.

    IF you cannot take such warm up trips you really need to figure on a minimum of at least 3 days to acclimate to the elevation where you are going if it is more than 4000' greater than what you are used to.

    The air really is thinner up there, it's no joke.

    All that being said my trip back up the same mountain on the 3rd day of the hunt was a breeze and since I was alone I was carrying enough gear to take care of myself if I got into trouble.