Carbon barrels

JMGamesniper19

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2016
Messages
422
Location
USA
Have you ever seen a barrel wear out from flexing before the rifling? Properly designed steel parts usually have life cycles of over 10^8 load cycles.
In high end custom guns, it is rare but in factory hunting rifles it actually happens quite a bit.
The definition we used in the data of wear out means that before the chamber, lands and grooves are worn past the point of having to rechamber or replace the barrel, the barrel loses accuracy. It happens with #2 and #3 barrels mostly but can happen in other contours and rifles due to steel used or build quality. The harmonics change to the point where the signature changes (the point at which the bullet leaves the barrel within the whip) where with the same exact load may shoot a sub moa group one day and a +2 moa group the next.

True, it is something most shooters won't see in a hunting rifle, sometimes PRS style shooters see it. So from a practical hunting and a weekend shooter standpoint who will never put 1500 rounds through a rifle, it may not be as relevant but from a materials, technology and capability standpoint, ill take carbon over steel anytime.
 

aschler

Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2021
Messages
5
Location
St Louis
In high end custom guns, it is rare but in factory hunting rifles it actually happens quite a bit.
The definition we used in the data of wear out means that before the chamber, lands and grooves are worn past the point of having to rechamber or replace the barrel, the barrel loses accuracy. It happens with #2 and #3 barrels mostly but can happen in other contours and rifles due to steel used or build quality. The harmonics change to the point where the signature changes (the point at which the bullet leaves the barrel within the whip) where with the same exact load may shoot a sub moa group one day and a +2 moa group the next.

True, it is something most shooters won't see in a hunting rifle, sometimes PRS style shooters see it. So from a practical hunting and a weekend shooter standpoint who will never put 1500 rounds through a rifle, it may not be as relevant but from a materials, technology and capability standpoint, ill take carbon over steel anytime.
Have you ever started to see signs of failure? Usually you are going to see cracks on the microscopic level that start growing exponentially.
 

JMGamesniper19

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2016
Messages
422
Location
USA
Have you ever started to see signs of failure? Usually you are going to see cracks on the microscopic level that start growing exponentially.
Sometimes you will see alligator skin on the inside of the barrel, that shows you that the material is breaking down. I have seen it in barrels of various ages and most recently in a 6.5 CM with less than 1500 rounds through it from a prominent and well known manufacturer who I wont name. Sometimes there are no signs at all, it looks perfect and just wont shoot.
Additionally, steel is susceptible to large ambient temperature changes, where carbon is not. Carbon wrapped steel barrels are not susceptible to ambient temps when built right.
So if you are shooting a #2 steel and it is sighted in on day 1 at 65 degrees and at day 3 it is 25 degrees, which happens out west a lot, you may want to check zero. Wont be a big deal at 300 yards but at 500+ yards, it will
 
Top