bobcats

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by ryan olsen, Jan 3, 2005.

  1. ryan olsen

    ryan olsen Member

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    I'm hunting with a model 788 22-250 and im shooting bobcats from 50-300 yards. I'm having trouble not blowing them up. I'm looking for some very accurate loads that will not leave a big hole in the back side. Any info would be great.thanks
     
  2. Paul Wyatt

    Paul Wyatt Well-Known Member

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    Ryan;
    Barnes makes a spire pointed solid in both 22 and 6mm that I loved for using on critters that had pelts that I wanted to save. They were very accurate in the 6mm and my rifle. It has been several years since I used them, but Barnes makes both a 45 and 50 grain solid sptizer in 22 cal. You can check them out at: http://www.theextremehunter.com/site/448423/page/315734
    Brassbender
     
  3. ryan olsen

    ryan olsen Member

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    thanks brassbender. do you know anything about slowing down a smaller ballistic tip? like a 30 grain nosler. i was told the would go in but not come out. what do you think?
     
  4. Paul Wyatt

    Paul Wyatt Well-Known Member

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    I'm probably the wrong guy to ask about that because I have never been a fan of downloading for field use - plays too much havoc with trying to figure trajectories - the down loads work fine for the close ranges, but are real mind benders for the 300 yard shots you refer to. The real problem that I have experienced with these loads is being able to develop loads that are consistant - especially in the hot 22's and 6mm's. Just my impression. Like I said, I have never been a fan and therefor never spent a lot of time trying to develop that kind of load. Maybe someone else has had different experiences with it.
    Good luck
    Brassbender
     
  5. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    Ryan,

    Generally accuracy drops off when velocity is dropped much under where a specific cartridge is designed to run at. Other problems such as dirty powder burns because of the low pressure and velocity spread increases are also common.

    In my experience it is much better to go to a heavier stouter bullet to save on pelts. Using a solid is great for pelts but can cause some headaches tracking hit animals if they can get into cover.

    I have used the Hornady 55 and 60 gr SP bullets a great deal and they are a stour bullet for a conventionally built .224" bullet.

    They also are generally very accurate in the 3300 to 3400 fps level which is slightly reduced but still up in good working pressures.

    Give them a try and see how they work for you.

    Good Shooting!!!

    Kirby Allen(50)
     
  6. sniper2

    sniper2 Well-Known Member

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    Try the little 35gr bullets for the bobcats they will have less energy.
     
  7. dakor

    dakor Well-Known Member

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    I have a few ideas that might help you. I was looking for the same thing only on Red fox and here is what I have tried and it works most of the time. 1. You could get the 30 grain Berger MEF drive them fast and these will blow up inside and should not exit. 2. You could shoot a Sierra 52 MatchKing at around 3500 to 3600 or the Sierra 55 Gamkeking I have had good luck with these out of my 220 Swift. 3. You could go with a Barnes 50 grain X bullet or a barnes solid. If you are calling them you might want to try shoot them through the chest because then your bullet has a couple of feet to go through and most of the time will not exit. Hope this helps.
     
  8. LB

    LB Well-Known Member

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    First of all, there is no 100% solution, given the facts, 22-250 on bobcat.

    The "high velocity light bullet staying inside" theory is not reliable. Especially at the stated ranges.

    Normal weights for that caliber 52/55 grain, can cause a lot of damage.

    If your gun can handle it, I would agree with 50, use a heavier bullet with the plan being that it won't open up on such a lightly constructed animal. Myself, I use 65 grain bullets that always exit. A well placed shot should leave a half dollar exit, but if you hit major bones, you will wreck a pelt. No guarantees.

    As an experiment, one year, I used 40 grain Sierra Hornet bullets in a 220 Swift. In a heavy rifle, from a rest where you can aim very precisely, I was making head shots that didn't exit. That load was bad on the barrel and brass, but it did work, more often than not.

    The subject of harvesting fur with a centerfire caliber is very controversial. Some claim that 14 or 17 caliber is the answer, but there will be problems, no matter which direction you go. Mainly, you have to decline those shots that will not put the animal down, or will hit the shoulder, causing splash wounds and a runner.

    I've been doing this for a long time and don't have an answer. I have come to believe that the first consideration is to kill the animal dead, and cross your fingers when it comes to damage. At this point in my education, my theory is heavy, well constructed bullets, carefully placed.

    Good luck, LB
     
  9. chris matthews

    chris matthews Well-Known Member

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    While I agree with LB that the is no 100% I will add that I have never lost a cat or coyote from using a 17 Rem. at ranges from 10 ft to over 400 yards. The worst pelt damage was afemale yote shot in Wyoming at 430 yds I was trying for a head shot and the wind changed up a bit as I made the shot and I caught the top of the neck. It broke tyhe necjk and sent bone and hide everywhere. But over all I am pleased with the 17s performance on killing power and saving hides. And I too, have been doing this awhile from Texas to Alberta. FWIW.