Binoculars for someone wearing progressive lens glasses?

Sid Post

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If you can't guess, I wear glasses! :cool:

If this thread is redundant, I must have missed it in my search because surely I'm not the only one looking for binoculars with this issue.

I'm looking for better quality than I can find at most 'common' stores near where I live where a pair that runs >$400 is for wealthy yuppies with more money than common sense. :rolleyes:

Looking at some random Swarovski, Leica, and Zeiss specs, I'm seeing eye relief ranges in the mid to high teens in millimeters. ~17mm means in practical terms my FOV is going to be a bit small as the barrels clip my image.

I have a couple of pairs of 6 and 8 power 32mm objective bins but, I'm looking for something in the 12 power range with at least 42's for light gathering unless the resolution is so much better I can stay in the 8 to 10 power range and see the details. I need something with more range, great FOV, excellent detail, and low light performance which to me suggests a big heavy pair from a proven European brand.

Where should I be looking in the $1K~$2K range and what 'performance' differences are a reasonable expectation between $1,000 and $2,000 price points. I need to be able to use these for longer periods of time so, eye fatigue is a concern with cheaper glass.
 

alcesgigas

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Apart from a full custom rifle, apart from its scope (which, on average, should cost nearly as much to maybe a little more), binoculars should, in my view, cost more. They're used more, for longer periods of time, perhaps throughout the year, maybe by spouse and family, but most importantly if you can't see it--"it's" not there at all. So, again my personal belief, binoculars--not scope, rifle, spotting scope, or rangefinder--is the most important piece of kit a hunter carries in the field. In my experience a top tier binocular, say 10x42mm, reveals more at greater distances than a 15 or 20x50 or 56mm and it does so without eye strain, headaches, arm and shoulder cramps, a fertile imagination with the ability to tell tall tales, etc.

On the con side: One may have to refinance their home, get a divorce, sell a kidney, or/and resort to late night activities to which uniformed public servants pay a great deal of attention. The second "con" is the pesky personal preference aspect of top tier glass; ones "best glass" may be another's curse. Everybody's eyes are unique--no two are alike--and too often even an individual's eyes may differ greatly one from the other. So the buyer needs doing the "tire-kicking" themselves for the best possible outcome.

Remember: your wallet sees nothing and if one lets their wallet do the seeing, well, then your eyes will do the paying.
 
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Sid Post

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A few good points there. Yes, biology and genetics play a role in what works best for one person and may be a general failure for the next. The next factor is personal bias and brand preference.

And yes, with a 12 or 15 power pair of bins for more than momentary use, a tripod or similar support is really needed. Even 8x56's get darn heavy for more than brief use.

In terms of cost, yes I generally agree that optics is the weak link for most people because you can't hit what you can't see, or see but can't differentiate from a valid target (Buck) or an invalid one (Doe). Most 'rack grade' rifles have enough inherent accuracy to take game animals, with appropriate stalking and hunter skill, without getting into really expensive or boutique rifles.
 
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They all suck. I've tried them all. if you want to see WELL you have to keep your glasses on a string and get them outta the way.
 

Barrelnut

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Looking at some random Swarovski, Leica, and Zeiss specs, I'm seeing eye relief ranges in the mid to high teens in millimeters. ~17mm means in practical terms my FOV is going to be a bit small as the barrels clip my image.
I were progressives and have no issues with eye relief using binos. Most binos have fold down eye cups that allow the glasses wearer to get their glass lenses very close to the bino lenses. I fold down the cups and look through the tops of my progressives and have no eye relief or shadow issues.

I have some mid-range binos: Optolith and Zeiss. If you can afford more higher-end in the Leica and Swarovski area there will be a noticeable increase in detail.
 
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WildBillG

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I have owned both Swarovski and Ziess binos both give you full field of view while wearing glasses. The eye cups on both turn down to compensate for your glasses. Now I have heard that progressive lenses are a pain. You may want to go to a normal bifocal for hunting. Yes the top end binos make a big difference. My advice would be get a set of 10x42 or 10x50s. The extra 2 power and better glass will be more then you could ask for. Also follow the manufacturers instructions on how to focus them to your eyes. The factory setting may not suit your eyes it makes a big difference trust me. Hope this helps.
 

WhiteRiver

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I wear progressive lenses too. I have owned many pairs of binoculars over the years and still have an assortment depending on what I am using them for and how I am getting there. My standbys for hunting are Swarovski EL 10x42mm. I can glass with those for long periods without fatigue. I can throw them up for a quick look with my glasses on, or if I'm sitting, I can take off my glasses and really use them to their full capability. I have some Nikon Monarch 10x42mm that live in the truck and a nice pair of Leica 8x32mm Ultravids for when I travel and weight is a concern. That said, the Swaro ELs have the best combination of clarity, color, and ergonomics of any binos I have ever used. They are expensive but will likely be lifelong companions.
 

Scott E Ames

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I wear progressives and like the others above just put them in my pocket when using my binoculars and shooting. I have Swaro's and Zeiss bino's and both are extremely sharp with my glasses in my pocket. If you set them up with your glasses off they will work with no problems.
 

dxlbaile

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Ditto glasses off, but be careful if excitement starts don't leave your glasses sitting somewhere.. IN YOUR POCKET is the best. I get the crapiest field of view even with swaro's with my glasses on.
 

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