Weatherby resizing

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Takem406, May 9, 2015.

  1. Takem406

    Takem406 Well-Known Member

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    Starting to reload for Grandpa's old 270 Weatherby. Anyways I'm considering a neck sizer for it. But not sure if I'd be better off full length sizing because of the double radius shoulder. Any tips?
     
  2. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    Neck sizing is always good for belted cases, but you can do the same with a full length sizing die if you back it off just enough to chamber.

    After the first firing a belted case becomes a shouldered case unless you full size it where it head spaces off the belt again.

    I recommend sizing only enough to chamber the round if you want to increase brass life and improve accuracy.

    While hunting dangerous game it is best to full length size to make chambering a round in a less than clean chamber possible.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  3. Takem406

    Takem406 Well-Known Member

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    I think I may go ahead and buy a set of Forster or Redding dies. I've noticed that my Dillon doesn't like RCBS in that they need to be set so far down in the die block. The Forster set I have for 223 and 308 seem to be longer.

    So in looking for a new die set go ahead and just get the neck die or both? Maybe full length them every other loading? Should I also get a headspace gauge?
     
  4. Dosh

    Dosh Well-Known Member

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    406, are you loading for the German Wby with the outstanding stock? Did you find what twist it has? I neck size my brass unless there is abnormally tight bolt lift, then use the full length die for my .270 Wby and trim. As JE stated the shoulder needs close attention. Good luck
     
  5. Takem406

    Takem406 Well-Known Member

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    She's at the gun Smith right now. I found a Bell and Carlson stock at the gun show for 150 for the German Weatherby! So I figured that would keep the factory wood all pretty. I asked the smith to check the twist. I guess I'll find out when I get it back.
    I went ahead and bought some 130 Nosler Ballistic Tips to play with. No Accubonds to be had. So I figured these would work on paper. And get me sort of close then I'll try the Accus.
    Probably will get the Forster Match die with the neck sizer. That or Redding has a three die set, seater, and the two sizing dies.
    Should I be crimping these rounds? Also what about neck tension dies like the ones Redding has.
    I went to try and load today to find that the Weatherby dies had been placed in the 270 Winchester box that's at my dad's house 90 miles away lol! Couldn't figure why the Weatherby brass wouldn't fit into the sizing die! Oh well...
    Thanks guys!
     

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  6. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    The three die sets are a good idea and at times you can/will use all three dies.

    If you buy the "S" type dies to find the bushing you need, it is recommended that you mic. the
    outside of a loaded round and then reduce the dimension by .003 to .004 thousandths for the bushing size. (.277+ neck wallx2 Might equal .301) so the bushing should be a .298 or a .297.

    Also the 130 grain ballistic will be a good hunting bullet until you find some Accubonds in my opinion.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  7. Takem406

    Takem406 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the information!
    The Ballistic will hold together alright at the high speed? What's the deal with Burger? Seems like their VLD bullets are accurate but they don't hold together...
     
  8. Dr. Vette

    Dr. Vette Well-Known Member

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    For my 7mm Weatherbys (same song, different verse) I use a Redding body die to bump the shoulder back about 0.02 as measured with my Innovative Technologies gauge. I then go ahead and neck size them, and reload. By doing this I minimize how much the brass gets worked and also am sure that the brass will chamber easily.

    If nothing else, should you decide to full length size you should consider bumping the shoulder back in a similar manner. Using the correct tool to see how much you actually move the shoulder is quite valuable.

    Good luck!