The importance of Camo clothing when hunting Pronghorn?

Reno1121

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Lake Lure, NC
I vote for the cow decoy.
 

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Barrelnut

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End of the Oregon Trail
The reason you look up while cleaning your kill and find the herd back and starting at you is because it is second nature for them to do this. Once spooked the herd tends to run in a big circle and come right back to the place they were. This can work to your advantage. If you spook them just sit for an hour or so. You may be surprised and find they come right back from another direction.
 

Sandhillshunter

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Feb 18, 2021
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Nebraska
We may have camo on when hunting, but that's just because its what we have. Not really needed imo. I personally just like using neutral colors now and not worry about fancy camo anymore.
 

VLD Pilot

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Northern, Mi
During the rut, all you need is a white handkerchief on the end of an old arrow shaft--- wave it in the air every once in a while and the bucks come running--- its a regular tool I use for bow or muzzle loader hunting
Seems like waving a white flag during pronghorn season on the open plains is like carrying a whitetail buck decoy thru the woods in the Midwest during rifle season. Kinda like putting a bullseye on yourself. Sounds like the hunters may be a little smarter and more cautious out there than here. You'd be shot if you did something like that here on state land in my home state.
 

ndking1126

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Sep 12, 2010
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I should add how stupid they can be too. I have had them wind me and come in for a look. Also, after you shoot one you can often look behind you and they will be standing there at 80 yards, staring at you. Still, camo doesn't really matter in my opinion.
Kind of an old thread I know but wanted to say on my one antelope hunt I kind of had a similar experience. Some are skiddish and run as soon as you move towards you, some are curious. I shot at one at 330 yards off to my left and missed due to high winds. It ran about 100, 125 yards left to right, stopped broadside and turned to look at me. I didn't miss the second shot.

Antelope hunting is unlike any other hunting I've ever done. I'd recommend you take the plunge, Trogon! I also think it's probably the animal you are most likely to get a shot if you have a do-it-yourself hunt with limited to no scouting time.
 
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