Scope mounts...

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by Silverdoctor, Dec 12, 2013.

  1. Silverdoctor

    Silverdoctor Active Member

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    I am mounting a new long range scope on a Savage 116, 300 Win. Mag. for my son. The question I have is: should I put any adhesive between the bases and the barrel? When I removed the old scope, there was residue from an adhesive a gunsmith had apparently placed between the mounts and stainless steel barrel. I do use Lock Tite blue on the mount screws, but is it helpful to use a drop or two between the barrel and the mounts?

    Also, how important is it to lap modern rings? Does it really make a difference?

    Thanks,

    Silverdoctor
     
  2. Dosh

    Dosh Well-Known Member

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    Silverdoctor, I have found lapping helps if you don't go too deep. I have read 80% contact is about deep enough. Perhaps the adhesive you found was excess from an abundance of Locktite on the screws, I have seen this on some bases. Good luck
     
  3. Hired Gun

    Hired Gun Well-Known Member

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    No need to put anything under the base.
     
  4. Kennibear

    Kennibear Well-Known Member

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    silverdoctor

    Lots of opinions on this
    Mine: I have become a big fan of the one piece ring/mount combo. Not taking my scopes off when they go on. I clean under the base, both mount and ring, with solvent (nitromethane then final clean with lacquer thinner) and apply red Locktight to the surfaces and blue Locktite to the screw threads. I have done this for thirty + years. When I take off a base I have found the red Locktite is spread unevenly on the metal meaning it is imperfect contact between surfaces. That is justification enough for me to Locktite it all down. I shoot some HEAVY recoil guns and the mounts don't come loose.

    There are newer rings that use a spherical bushing to take out alignment errors and they work. I just think fewer parts is better. Short of mounting everything and then cutting the scope bed there is mis-alignment.
    p_00493.jpg
    This an alignment tube for a set of Tally ring/mounts on a Tikka 7mm RemMag. The mounts are prepped and installed except for final tightening Sushed forward the mount is tightened through holes in the tube. Scope clamps are loosened and move forward and the second set of screws are tightened. Back and forth until everything is cinched down. Wait 24 hrs to do the next step.
    View attachment p_00494.jpg
    This is an aluminum tube used w/ valve grinding compound to lap in the scope bed. I have three sizes of tube I picked up from the remnant stack at Metals Supermarket, 0.998", 1.000" and 1.002"(I came with a caliper and dug around). Watching the annodizing (black) I grind down until it comes out even to what I want.
    View attachment p_00495.jpg
    If you look closely the left side has black remaining and the right upper has some remaining. This is why I lap the rings in, as I have for over thirty years. The scope beds get cleaned/ red Locktite and the screws get cleaned/ blue Locktite. You will be amazed at how oily the screws are! a drop of red Locktite goes on the scope clamps too.

    This may seem like overkill to some but my scopes don't go out of zero when I have walked in to nowhere early on opening day. I don't trace down string groups to my scopes. Can you get away with a simpler install? Maybe yes, maybe no.

    But my way is for sure for sure.

    KB
     
  5. Dosh

    Dosh Well-Known Member

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    Kenni, nice thread. I use the Talley rings exclusively and have never had any problems.
     
  6. Kennibear

    Kennibear Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Dosh!

    Please don't be intimidated when you read this. You can do this believe me. Sometimes I think people pass up things that improve matters because they are intimidated by the process. The most difficult thing is finding the valve grinding compound.

    Total work time is about one hour. First time took about three hours. It is for me an enjoyable crafty time, just like loading ammo. The worst part is walking away to let the bases set up (my lack of patience). Most of the time I try to let the bases set up for several days. Lap the rings, cinch the scope down and wait a couple more days. Should take better pictures next time and post a how to article.

    This is very easy. Do it!!!

    KB
     
  7. Steyr Luxus

    Steyr Luxus Well-Known Member

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    It would seem to me that using aluminum bar stock with grinding compound would cause the aluminum bar stock to wear unevenly; uneven lapping. It may work well with aluminum rings and bases but what about stell rings and bases?
     
  8. Kennibear

    Kennibear Well-Known Member

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    Steyr Luxus

    I really need a longer venue. Measure the tubing and mark it with the size. Since I buy 3' or so rem's I cut 10" pieces off. By using different portions of the 10" piece of tube you get about 8 - 10 lappings with it before chucking it. Old school lapping uses a soft lap tool for a hard item so the abrasive embeds in the lap and is captured there forming a perfectly shaped abrasive tool. The abrasive moves with the lap and works across the surface of the item.

    Aluminum tube works on steel rings. On aluminum rings you have to clean all the grit out but an aggressive solvent like lacquer thinner (or nitromethane followed by lacquer thinner) will get all of the abrasive out.

    Measure your scope diameter. I have found them to be less than 1" by maybe two thousandths. Use a lap tube at or slightly less than the scope's measured diameter. Hence the multiple sizes of lap stock I keep on hand. I have a 1" standard I take to Metal Supermarket to set my caliper, it makes fast work at the rem pile.

    Probably should use 1 - 2 thousandths under every time. Just my opinion, there are much better machinists here that can better advise on that.

    KB