Removing Bedding Material in a stock

Black67

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What is the best way to remove the bedding material in a factory wood stock? I believe this is some of the problems that I am having with my 30-06. I have not been happy with how this gun shoots, and I have been all over with this gun with different types of ammo. I changed out scope bases too just to see if that might have been the problem.

I have a Winchester Model 70 Featherweight stainless FN model. When I have the action just sitting in the stock, it has a pivot point just infront of the lug, at the start of the barrel. I see a large amount of bedding material at this location and where it is making contact. Also, the barrel is not straight in the channel, and I think a bit of extra material is on one side of the lug.

So, what I was thinking of doing was to either remove this material and bed it myself or put it into another Featherweight stock that I have. I have a New Haven Featherweight stock that I bought when I lived in Conn, and the figuring is close to a SuperGrade stock. I know that if I go to the New Haven stock, that I have to trim some on the back left side to fit, but not sure where else on top. The bottom metal won't fit, so I would have to either work the stock to make if fit or see if a 2 piece bottom metal would work with the FN action. Also, if I do all this I would pillar bed and bed the action on either stock.

Just looking for some input and ideas concerning this.

Thanks for the help.
 

FearNoWind

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My favorite tool for stock work is the Dremel. It can be a little tricky to control sometimes but with full concentration and a firm hold it can work wonders.
I'd suggest making changes that put the action in the position you want it and then bed the action like it should be.
 

Dr. Vette

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I have a Dremel with a large variety of tips, and also use an X-Acto knife set for carving which also has a variety of blades. In addition I have several files. Using all of these I can remove bedding and start over.

If I were you that's what I would do. It sounds like it was not done corrently.
 

Black67

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Yep, have a Dremel. Was just wondering if there was some "special" tool that was used or something that I did not see or know of for this.

I might start working on this soon, as I have been fighting with this for some time.

Thanks for your replies.
 

Dosh

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I have a Dremel with a large variety of tips, and also use an X-Acto knife set for carving which also has a variety of blades. In addition I have several files. Using all of these I can remove bedding and start over.

If I were you that's what I would do. It sounds like it was not done corrently.
67, had the same situation with a 03-A3 that was my friend's dad's. He inherited it with bedding from the lug to the fore end tip all of which was way unbalanced to the right. Dremeled and round filed it all out and aligned barrel in channel with tape around the barrel to center it. After new bedding, the old 1944 rig shoots quite well with some factory 30-06 ammo. Yours sounds like a lot less work. Good luck
 

FearNoWind

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Black67

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FearNoWind

Thanks for those. I will have to see what I have in my Dremel kit. If not, the kids and I might hit the hardware store tomorrow. The kids like the free popcorn.

Dosh

Ya, not as much work as what you have. Mine is around the recoil lug and barrel.
 

jrock

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My favorite tool for stock work is the Dremel. It can be a little tricky to control sometimes but with full concentration and a firm hold it can work wonders.
I'd suggest making changes that put the action in the position you want it and then bed the action like it should be.
Only way to go
 

Punisher

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I am working on a featherweight right now. A .243 FN model.

You aren't going to be able to pillar bed the rear screw. Not enough stock to do it in that location.
 

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Punisher

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Rear screw got JB weld bedded in mine.

There were a lot of reasons mine wouldn't shoot well. There is so little bedding material, that action screw torque was paramount to the whole system. The bump under the barrel in the stock is supposed to make the stock feel more ridgid when it is in fact, very, very thin.

The barrel was not very well made. The tennon was shorter than most that I have seen and there was a lot of slop in the barrel threads.
 

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Black67

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Punisher

For your pillars, did you buy those or make them?

I have noticed with mine, if I torque the action screws above 35 in lbs, I can not remove the bolt from the rifle.

As for the barrel, I have not looked into that yet. When I do the stock work, if I am not happy I will then look there. If I do not like what I see, then I will make a drive to get it replaced when money allows. I have Benchmark north of me, and PacNor a few hours south of me.

Also for the trigger, I see you have a Timney. How do you like that over the MOA trigger? My MOA was set at 4.5 lbs from the factory, and was able to get it to 3.5 lbs for the lowest. I was wanting to get it to 3 lbs. I have been spoiled by my M70 Sharpshooter, 2.5 lbs and my AR, 3 lbs.
 

Black67

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Everyone

Thanks for your replies on this. I have removed all of the bad bedding from the stock, and now the barrel is centered in the wood. Before, it was off to the right and just touching the very end of the stock. I could not believe how much bedding was used in the recoil lug area and how it was not centered at all.

The various bits mentioned worked great, thanks for the bit advise.

So, I am planning on pillar bedding first the stock first, then removing some wood and then bedding the action. Is this the best method or should I do everything at once?

What is everyones thoughts on bedding the first 2" of barrel? I read some say to do it and others say no. I am not sure what direction to go. My Laredo has the first 2" of barrel bedded, and that gun shoots .5" groups all day.

Thanks again for your help

Bill
 

Dosh

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Bill, I usually bed to the front of the chamber like on your Laredo. Most shoot very well, but if not you can Dremel away small amounts to shorten the reach and test for effect. Your plan sounds fine. Perhaps use Marine-Tex epoxy, it's very strong and priced right. To help center the barrel in the barrel channel try wrapping tape on the barrel till it touches the sides of the channel checking the barrel float clearance. I use two extra long cut off screws in the action which help in alignment, lots of blue painters tape and Kiwi Neutral polish everywhere I don't want the epoxy to stick. Good luck
 

Black67

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Everyone

Well, I have completed the work on this project. The barrel is now nice and centered in the stock like it should be. I ended up putting pillars in the front and rear of this stock. For the rear near the tang, I put epoxy in the trigger cut out before drilling. As per Punisher, the drill bit would break out early into this area and then cause problems. So, I filled this in some with Devcon, as I had some on hand. I let it sit for about 5 days so that it would be cured. I also cleaned out most of the epoxy after the pillar was installed. The trigger assembly would make contact and not allow it to sit into the stock.

The pillar and bedding kit that I used was from Score-High, and the adjustable pillars worked nice. I used a piloted counter bore with a hand drill for the pillars.

For the rear pillar, I had to make a relief cut into for the small trigger spring. This spring caused the action to not sit correctly in the stock on the pillar. I made a small adjustment with the Dremel and a carbide tip, and not have a nice area for this spring to sit.

I also bedded the first 2" of the barrel, and I could not believe the amount of material this took to fill.

While I had the trigger off, I replaced the trigger spring too. The trigger is now just under 3 lbs and feels great. With the factory spring I was able to get it to about 3.2 lbs, but was very inconsistant. With the new spring, I average was within an oz or two of what I saw on my scale.

As of right now, I have the stock torqued down at 50 in lbs.

Now, I need to go and shoot the gun to see how it does. The next open range day that I can go to is a week out.

I do want to thank all of you for your help with this. As this was my first job like this, your help and knowledge has been great.
 

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