New stock

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by LexRick, Jul 20, 2019.


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  1. LexRick

    LexRick Active Member LRH Team Member

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    I'm thinking of a new stock for Browning A bolt any suggestions. Don't really want to spend $500
     
  2. lgordee

    lgordee Well-Known Member

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    I'm not familiar with what is available for the Browning A bolt, however it would be a great help to those who are to know what your intended uses/goals for the rifle are. Good luck with your rifle.
     
  3. Hatrick

    Hatrick Well-Known Member

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    About 20 years ago I sent my Medallion barreled action to Browning to have a stalker stock installed. While not the best stock it served the purpose. It came back bedded and has been good to me since. I don’t know if they still do it but they sell rifles now with some pretty nice stocks.
     
  4. Deputy819

    Deputy819 Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    Frog4aday, LexRick and Dosh like this.
  5. aushunter1

    aushunter1 Well-Known Member

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    I have a Boyds pepper laminate on my 270 Abolt.
    I also glass bedded the action & added pillars.
    Turned it into a 1/2 moa rifle.
     
    5.56×250 and Dosh like this.
  6. ducky

    ducky Well-Known Member

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    What is the purpose for changing from the original stock? I'm not a fan of the weight laminated stocks bring, and usually don't consider them on rifles I will carry hunting.From the price you don't want to spend you probably have been looking at McMillan.

    Unfortunately for Browning rifles you don't have much choice when it comes to aftermarket stocks, for composite stocks McMillan and B&C are the main choices. B&C is about half the cost of a McMillan and if you have ever had to handle both you'd understand why. McMillan will just feel more lively in your hands, as it is less bulky all around.

    B&C makes a decent product that I have and have used. But the quality of B&C is far below that of McMillan, making Mickey stocks worth every penny of the extra money. If your goal is lightweight then B&C really isn't in the running, just suck it up and spend the $700+ on the Edge fill.

    I get that it's a budget thing but I know for my money, I'd save up the extra and go for the McMillan.
     
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  7. LexRick

    LexRick Active Member LRH Team Member

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  8. LexRick

    LexRick Active Member LRH Team Member

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    I got the gun in a trade and don't really like the lighting bolt pattern in current stock. It's a 7mm stw and is going to montana next year for a mule deer hunt. I don't really care for laminated stocks but my Remy 280 has one and it's not to bad.
     
  9. ducky

    ducky Well-Known Member

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    Is that something that could be hidden with a paint job or hydrodip? I'm pretty ignorant when it comes to Browning rifles and the stock you're talking about.. Paint or hydrodip might be a cheap alternative to buying a stock. I still say save the pennies and buy a McMillan with standard fill if you go the replacement route.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2019
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  10. 5.56×250

    5.56×250 Well-Known Member

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    The Boyd's featherweight thumbhole is under 3 lbs . It has a wide forend for shooting off bags but still holds really nice offhand. Do a pillar bed job on it and your good to go. No hollow feel or sound and stays warm when hunting . Laminated wood means no warpage from rain or temp extremes too.
    Not the high tech choice of today, but does everything as good or better than fiberglass or plastic.
     
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  11. Frog4aday

    Frog4aday Well-Known Member

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    I would suggest avoiding the 'thumbhole' stock in a hunting rifle unless you've had one before and liked it. I got one for my 77/22 (.22LR) as I always thought they looked slick/sexy. Then I tried to fire and work the bolt quickly and quickly grew to hate the dang thing. Having to 'unwrap' my hand from the hole every time to work the bolt was irritating and slower than a 'regular' stock. Then I had to 'thread' my hand back through for the next shot. Tedious.

    I see now manufacturers are offering 'thumbhole' stocks that are cut with huge 'openings' (probably to mediate what I experienced.) But I won't get one again. Perhaps for a 10/22 (semi-auto) it would have been okay as I wouldn't have to work the action after ever shot on that gun. Anyway, just sharing a data point to consider.

    I'm with 5.56X250 on the virtues of the laminated stocks vs. straight walnut. I like them for their wood feel and stability. But dang if there wasn't a thread on here recently warning people off laminated stocks due to splitting when fired in heavy kicking calibers. The suggested 'fix' was to pillar bed any laminated stock being used on a hunting gun to avoid the issue. It's always something, no?

    I thought the Bell & Carlson Medalist stock that Deputy819 pointed you toward ($272) was a great choice.
    https://www.stockysstocks.com/stock...wsm-weatherby-mk-v-with-aluminum-bedding.html
    I also like the idea of hydro-dipping your current stock if it's just a cosmetic issue you are trying to get away from. Not a lot of options for an A-Bolt, but thankfully there are some.
     
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  12. 5.56×250

    5.56×250 Well-Known Member

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    I would pillar bed it regardless, just so you can properly torque the action screws. I just did one of boyds thumbhole stocks and after the pillar bedding I relieved the wood in the action area and did a glass bed job on it too.
    I dont have any issues with coming out of the stock to work the bolt like frogforaday had, but the hole is pretty generous on that particular stock. I admit, I dont do much speed shooting with a bolt gun anyway, but working the bolt on that gun happens just as naturally as a standard grip for me.
    I saw the same thread on the stock breakage, but I thought the OP on that thread was shooting a big magnum . Since the first move I would recommend would be a pillar bed job, that problem would be moot , it you went that route.
    Boyd's also has premade stocks that are deeply discounted, so if they happen to have one to fit your browning, you can save enough to put towards ammo, some new glass, etc. I think the "at once " stocks are less than 100 bucks before shipping.
    .
     
  13. e1harris

    e1harris Well-Known Member

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    Can't beat a Bell & Carlson for the price.