Lead Sled 3 Review

General RE LEE

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Aug 21, 2020
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Middle Tennessee
I’ve been using a Caldwell Tack Driver shooting bag for a few years now. Great rest for the range but I’m looking for something a little more steady with recoil reduction to discover best ammo for my rifles. I ordered a Caldwell Lead Sled 3 from Cabelas on sale. Anyone own or got feedback on this rest? It doesn’t have windage adjustment like the more expensive model. I plan to get 25 lb bar bell weights to weigh it down.
 

Deputy819

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Sep 24, 2016
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Frankfort, Ky
I had one of its predecessors for a couple days and quit using it. Never could get my rifles to shoot/group worth a darn using that thing. They shot just fine with a good front rest and a Protektor rear bag, though. I soon learned why... 😇
 

FEENIX

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Dec 20, 2008
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Great Falls, MT
I still have the original and never had any problem with it. My only challenge is that I cannot cradle it good enough.

ADDED: I do not use any weight to try to reduce/eliminate the recoil.

I also have a ...


 
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sedancowboy

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Wilsall, MT
Lots of problems arise using the lead sled. I know there are people here that use them but I have seen broken stocks and damaged scopes with them. Enough that I stay away from them. The more weight you add the worse they are on your rifle. Think about it the recoil has to go somewhere?
 

FEENIX

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Lots of problems arise using the lead sled. I know there are people here that use them but I have seen broken stocks and damaged scopes with them. Enough that I stay away from them. The more weight you add the worse they are on your rifle. Think about it the recoil has to go somewhere?
Exactly! That is why I noted not using weight. For me, the unit has enough weight and it is NOT necessary to add additional counterweight. When used properly, it has its merits. I primarily use mine for barrel break-in (it allows me to transition from shooting and barrel cleaning with ease), initial load development (finalized with a bipod and prone), and general barrel cleaning. Having said that, I have plenty of different types of shooting rests.

NOTE: I am not in any way advocating the use of lead sled, just its proper use. There are better set-ups out there. I kept my original lead sled because I found a workaround to "my" advantage.

OMG ...

Lead sled 3.JPG
 
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J E Custom

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Jul 29, 2004
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Texas
I use and like the lead sled #2 for it's adjustability. I also use it to remotely test fire newly built rifles.
Also I never add weight because it doesn't need it. (It weighs around 18 pounds). and it doesn't restrict the normal movement of the rifle.

I also use it for precision accuracy testing because it locates the front rest in the exact same spot every time. One of the main causes of inaccuracy, is changing the front rest location slightly while shooting. Once the accuracy load is found, then I will switch to sand bags or similar rest that will be used in the field. For finding the exact zero I want for hunting.

Bipods are another good rest If you hunt off the ground, but you need to practice and become proficient and consistent at using them. They also locate the front rest in the same location every time. Just like almost everything else in this sport, there is no one rest/thing that is best for everything and every situation.

The lead sleds have their place, and do what they were designed to if used properly. Rail guns use this system for ultimate accuracy and they will weigh many more times than a lead sled, They don't need a stock so the weight doesn't matter like adding 25 +pounds to the sled does. the only time I add weight to the sled is when doing slow motion Videos of rifle reactions to recoil and only enough to hold the rifle in a static position. On a few occasions, the test was discontinued to protect the stock.

I think it is a good tool if used properly and for certain reasons.

J E CUSTOM
 

lotech

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Jan 29, 2013
Messages
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Consider a good heavy and simple front pedestal rest like a Hart (assuming they're still made). A 1 1/2" wide Protektor leather bag will handle most hunting rifle forearms and a Protektor leather bunny bag for the rear rest is suited for virtually any rifle buttstock. The Hart rest with bag weighs around twenty pounds, is adjustable for elevation and has pointed "feet" that will prevent movement on the bench. You won't outgrow the Hart rest or wish you had bought something better. I'll agree that a Lead Sled may offer some limited usefulness for some, but I've yet to find that niche.
 

Paladin300

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Aug 24, 2020
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Alabama
Lots of problems arise using the lead sled. I know there are people here that use them but I have seen broken stocks and damaged scopes with them. Enough that I stay away from them. The more weight you add the worse they are on your rifle. Think about it the recoil has to go somewhere?
I agree, not a fan of the lead sled. Loaned a $3500 custom 270 to a guy about 10 years ago and he took it home and put it in a lead sled to check the zero he said. This gun was a Remington 700 Custom Shop AWR built in the late 90's and shot 1/2 moa with factory ammo when I loaned it to him to try out. Had a leupold 30mm VX 3 with a German #1, very hard to find. Got it back from him and he said he could not make it shoot less than 2 inches. Got it home and took it to the range to shoot it and sure enough it would no longer group consistently. Took it apart and the stock was cracked just in front of the trigger guard. Called to ask him what happened and he said nothing that the only thing he did was strap it in his lead sled and shoot it. $650 and a month later it was fixed. I don't shoot nor do I allow any of my rifles to be shot from a lead sled. Be very careful if you do, as has already been said all that energy has to go somewhere! A good front rest or bag and an equally good rear bag and support with proper form (being aligned properly behind the rifle), good trigger control and breathing (no drive by shooting) and that rifle will shoot as good as it ever will.
 

rando8586

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Dec 31, 2015
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Location
w mt
Cracked stock on Shiloh Sharps at wrist. Snapped stock off at the wrist on C Sharps. Didn't realize was cause until the 2nd one. Went to the Fire control model, it works great.
 
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