Is there a method for scope height?

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by NKYhunter, Aug 5, 2012.

  1. NKYhunter

    NKYhunter Member

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    Trying to figure out if I need to raise my scope. Is there a good system for this? Probably something really simple. About to purchase a new Vortex and I think it could sit a little higher.

    Thanks.
     
  2. KRP

    KRP Well-Known Member

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    Taller rings?
     
  3. NKYhunter

    NKYhunter Member

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    Yes. But, my question is, how do you know if taller rings are needed?
     
  4. bruce_ventura

    bruce_ventura Well-Known Member

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    You want the scope to clear the action, base and barrel. You also want a comfortable cheek weld. You can try looking at specs, but's tough to know for sure without having the rifle and scope in hand.

    Scope height is not the only parameter that determines the best cheek weld when shooting. Other factors bear as well, like your skeleton, clothing, shooting position, stock length of pull, scope eye relief, etc.

    You really need to verify the correct ring height for your particular scope, rifle and skeleton. I think the best method is to buy a cheap set of Weaver mount rings in three heights: med, high, and extra-high.

    Thoroughly evaluate various cheek rest positions using the cheap rings. Of course, you should do this in the shooting position you use most often. Wear the same clothing too. When you think you have it right, close your eyes, establish a comfortable cheek weld, and then open your eyes. Is the sight picture correct? If not, keep playing with scope position and cheek rest height until it is.

    Mount your scope using a couple heights and then decide which height gives you good clearance and a comfortable check weld. Most ring suppliers provide the height from the top of the rail to the bottom of the scope tube. Once you identify the cheap ring that gives the correct height, measure the ring height with a caliper or accurate ruler.

    Then buy your final rings.
     
  5. NKYhunter

    NKYhunter Member

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    Thanks Bruce.
     
  6. Wile E Coyote

    Wile E Coyote Well-Known Member

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    To determine the scope height you have existing, try the following;

    A) Measure the diameter of the bolt, and divide by 2. This number is F1 in the following equation.

    B) Measure the diameter of the scope tube and divide by 2. This number is F2

    C) Measure the distance from the top of the bolt to the bottom of the scope tube. Use this number as is. This number is F3



    The equation: F1 + F2 + F3 = Scope Height

    Use this number for the scope height in your ballistic program
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2012