getting the vertical spread out

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Metzger, Apr 16, 2014.

  1. Metzger

    Metzger Well-Known Member

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    I have a nasty vertical spread of about 7 inches at 500 yards and a horizontal spread of about 3inches. How do I get that vertical spread down? Loads have a good SD I am thinking it might be the seating depth.
     
  2. jsthntn247

    jsthntn247 Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like you need to learn the proper way of working a load up, that's too much horizontal and vertical
     
  3. Metzger

    Metzger Well-Known Member

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    Well I have done under an inch edge to edge at 200 yard
     
  4. Barrelnut

    Barrelnut Well-Known Member

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  5. FearNoWind

    FearNoWind Well-Known Member

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    Before you start looking for a load problem that may not exist, what platform are you using at the bench? Sandbags, commercial rest with DIY sand bags/commercial bag, bipod (what surface is the bipod resting on) etc.
    Are you using a butt bag?
    IMO we all too often conclude that vertical and horizontal stringing is a load issue when, in many cases, it is something else. I'd suggest you eliminate all other possibilities before you start adjusting loads and seating depths. gun)
    IMO, your groups should be under 2.5 inches at 500 yards but 5 inches translates to .5 MOA at 100 so you're really not that far out of the ball park.
     
  6. Trickymissfit

    Trickymissfit Well-Known Member

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    you did not state whether you shooting off a bench, or with a bipod. Then if your shooting off a bench; what kind of front rest are you using, and what are you doing to support the rear of the stock? If your using a solid mechanical front rest like bench rest guys use, you may find a forend stop to seriously help you (did for me). If your using a rear bag, even the amount of sand in it will make a difference. Sand bags are not bad, but also have these same issues in the end. I never could make a bipod shoot all that well. Good enough to get by with, but nothing to write home about.

    The shape of the stock has a lot to do with how well they ride the bags. Most all factory style stocks do not ride the bags all that well. Some are fair, and some are horrible. My 700 Remington is horrible off a front rest plate, and I've tried several bag combos. But hag snuck around some of this by mounting a quarter inch thick aluminum plate on the bottom that extends a quarter inch wider than the sides of the forend. When out in the field I leave it at home as most all shots are off hand. The best bag I've found is a Protector filled with washed aquarium sand (kinda loose). The flat Sinclair bag works best with the plate. Now here's a cheap trick to try if your shooting off leather bags. Go to Walmart and buy a bottle of talcum powder. Coat the front bags and see if it helps. Remember it's often just minor tweaks, and not the switch to a McMillen Edge stock.
    gary