Forend Control & Crosshairs after shot

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by dims, Jun 6, 2018.

  1. dims

    dims New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2018
    Hi everyone,
    I've been shooting for a while, I have a .308 Remington SPS Tactical. Best groups I've shot through it while doing load development is in the pics.

    I've always shot around 1.5-2" groups, but this time, I shot from a prone position off a bipod and rear bag. I still got a bit of bipod jump, but my crosshairs landed "close" to the target after the shot (probably within about 1m or so).

    Been reading a lot and realised my main issue is my recoil management. Some people say grip the gun and pull it into your shoulder then load bipod, others say rest your hand on it and don't pull into your shoulder, others say to hold the forend down. Problem is, I just have no idea what works and what doesn't! The groups in the pic, I have not been able to replicate that, even with the same shooting position.
    Here is an article on forend control, which reckons that the holding the bag at the back is 'hollywood' style.
    ***EDIT** I've had to remove the link since i'm a new member and it will get marked as spam. But type in "Nathan Foster Hold that Forend" in Google and its the first link.

    What is your opinions on it?

    So questions!

    1. Do you guys pull the gun into your shoulder and load the bipod forward? Or are you in a position where it's kind of wedged between your shoulder and bipod WITHOUT you pulling it into your shoulder, so technically your body weight is just naturally leaning into it?

    2. Should you be pulling down the forend as mentioned in the article above? Or using a rear bag and shooting 'hollywood' style?

    3. After a shot, should the crosshairs land pretty much back on target? If so, how is this achieved as the 308 kicks a fair bit.

    Any other tips would be appreciated!!

    Oh also on a side note, I did shoot my .22 (cz452) as well at the range. Whilst naturally resting my cheek on it, bullets would spray around 1" at 50m. As soon as I lifted my cheek up, NOT load the bipod and literally just rest the butt of the gun on my shoulder (so not pulling in at all), and only part of me touching the gun was my finger tip (so hand wasn't touching at all) I was shooting a good 0.3-0.4" at 50m, basically 1 big hole from 5 shots. Is this normal, that not loading a bipod and not putting cheek on the gun at all would produce groups such as this?

    Hope the above made sense..

    Dim
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jun 6, 2018
  2. philipbrousseau

    philipbrousseau Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    150
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2016
  3. dims

    dims New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2018
    Thanks I had a read through. Looks as if question 3 points to yes, it should land back on target. I'll just try get further trigger time.