First timer

Ksduckhntr

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2017
Messages
272
headed to alsaska in August and I need to start gathering a gear list. We will be basing out of a forestry cabin on kodiak hunting black tail. I have never done this type of remote hunting. I live in Kansas and we drive within a couple hundred yards of our stands and walk the rest. So what gear should I be looking at to invest in. Clothing, pack, kitchen, etc... I am new so any advice is greatly appreciated.
 
Joined
Mar 25, 2018
Messages
23
Location
Oregon
antiseptic, learn the local plants for extra food/medicine. dont rely on solar panels. water filter, get some “darn tough” brand wool socks they have a lifetime warentee, if you survive the trip. wool sweater and gortex base layer or gortex sock/boot liner. waterproof boots, rain gear, get water proofing spray, gun lube, sharpening stone, and a little carving knife and keep your mind busy. some good dry gloves you can still shoot with. you can pack heavy and maybe not use everything or pack light and be ingenuitive. take lard and salt and honey , stick to whole grains not white flour, a cheap light skillet will last a season and you can toss it later, cast iron is heavy and nonstick pans are a dime a dozen at salvation army and they clean up without using water.

take a camera and gps, a nice camera will hold more memories than any pack you can find.

oh Danner Powderhorn boots look like they would be great in alaska.

take some trade goods, chocolate or extra ammo candy, cough drops, anthing that might make you a new friend if you meet a stranger. ive seen the meanest cats turn nice when you can share a creature comfort or trade something of value for some advice.

good luck!
 
D

Deleted member 103481

Guest
Money priority goes to Optics and Boots

You're going to spend a ton of time using both, and both will make you or break you. Can't hike with broken feet, can't shoot what you can't find.
 

Beardeddeer91

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 14, 2018
Messages
261
Location
Alabama
Money priority goes to Optics and Boots

You're going to spend a ton of time using both, and both will make you or break you. Can't hike with broken feet, can't shoot what you can't find.

These two plus a good pack. Good footwear (if possible bring more than one pair in case they get wet), a good pack if you’re going to need to carry weight is an absolute must, and good optics for the same reason posted above.
 

Ckgworks

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2018
Messages
744
Location
Washington
I went on a 10 float trip in AK for moose. My lessons learned, which may or may not apply.
1) bring way more food than you think you need! You burn a ton more calories than normal on these types of hunts.
2) Hip widers in AK are invaluable if hunting wet areas. We ended up wearing ours ALOT. They actually kept us nice and warm.
3) Bring enough layers! I really like wool, and top it off with GOOD rain gear.
4) Guns are not carried for comfort, but for the comfort they give!(not sure who said that, but credit to someone else)....have some kinda gun with you that would make you feel good when you run into a bear....especially on Kodiak, where I've read gunshots are a dinner bell.
5) Spend your money on making YOU comfortable FIRST! Like others said, boots, clothing, glass.
 

Ksduckhntr

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2017
Messages
272
Thanks guys for the responses. In regards to hip waders, that seems like a lot to pack when trying to climb up the mountain side. We will be in a forestry cabin on Frazer lake and hunting higher elevations. Would I be better suited with muck boots and hiking boots? What is a reasonable/quality set of Binos I should be looking at?
 

Ckgworks

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2018
Messages
744
Location
Washington
I'm not sure what Kodiak is like and I'm sure others can speak to it as far as waders go......I would assume deer and moose hang in differing terrain. I only brought waders for on the river, but I ended up hiking in them alot. We were alittle different in the fact that we had no way to dry out once wet (tent camping), so staying dry became pretty important. Hiking through the tundra, our pants would have been soaked.
 

Tidus56

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2018
Messages
1,205
Don't forget your big boy underwear for that charging grizzly! JK good luck and have fun.
 

middleofnowhere

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2016
Messages
326
Location
Yucca Valley, CA
I backpack hunted last August on an island near Cordova. The muskegs were wet, my all leather military issue goretex boots were soaked even after I treated with Obanauf’s. My cousins $400 boots did well, his feet were dry. Gaiters were helpful. The brush and devils club was thick, you need durable rain gear as breathable as possible. Some of the stuff we hiked through was absolutely crazy steep, wet and thick.

The hiking was as tough as I’ve done anywhere, Randy Newburg describes it perfectly in attached video.
I wouldn’t wear mucks or waders for the alpine stuff, you’ll regret it.
We never glassed very far for blacktails, I would say 8x or 10x would be suitable for most coastal island hunting. The alpine areas were absolutely beautiful when we got any sun.

 

Beardeddeer91

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 14, 2018
Messages
261
Location
Alabama
Thanks guys for the responses. In regards to hip waders, that seems like a lot to pack when trying to climb up the mountain side. We will be in a forestry cabin on Frazer lake and hunting higher elevations. Would I be better suited with muck boots and hiking boots? What is a reasonable/quality set of Binos I should be looking at?

I have never hunted Kokiak Island but if you are hunting some of the higher elevations there I would suggest nice rigid hiking boots that are waterproof and a quality pair of gaiters. I personally use Scarpa Kinesis boots and first lite gaiters on high elevations hunts. Just make sure not to get waterproof boots wet inside, or bring two pairs. As far as optics get the best you can afford and I typically prefer a 12x for glassing at elevation.
 

Target Tamers

Official LRH Sponsor
Joined
Jul 16, 2018
Messages
37
Location
United States
Like all the great suggestions. I emphasize quality boots, pack, warm/waterproof clothing, and excellent optics. It's nice that you'll have a cabin for base camp. Keep excess stuff there, and you'll learn after the first day what you'll need or can leave behind for the next day.
 
Top