Duracoat vs. Cerakote

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by jhibbard24, May 28, 2015.


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  1. jhibbard24

    jhibbard24 Well-Known Member

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    I hate the idea of baking everything with Cerakote. Duracoat is easy to apply and has worked pretty decent for me. Which is tougher and holds up to abuse. Please only real experience with both products. Don't need bias or hear say opinions.
     
  2. Str8shooterTX

    Str8shooterTX Well-Known Member

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    I used to use duracoat but went to the air dry cerakote for better durability and looks. The cerakote is by far the better coating. The air dry is only slightly less resistant then the bake on if allowed to fully cure.
     
  3. Dosh

    Dosh Well-Known Member

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    24, I had a rifle Cerakoted 5 years ago due to rust after a wet hunt ($160) it has no visible marks or scratches to this day. I take it on all my hunts for primary or coyotes, lots of use. However, I just reclaimed a friend's sporterized 1903A3 from the dead. I had it Duracoated ($60) to save him money, it was inherited from his dad. I am very impressed with the Duracoat finish, but time will tell. I have toyed with applying both coatings myself since I have an airbrush and a large smoker I could use as an oven.
     
  4. desertbull

    desertbull Well-Known Member

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    I have rifles with both. I Will never do duracoat again. It's only a slight upgrade from Rustoleum spray paint in my opinion.
     
  5. mountainman56

    mountainman56 Well-Known Member

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    I have been using duracoat for many years and have always been happy with the results. I've been thinking of trying cerakote as it seems to be more popular but I can't figure out why I should change.:rolleyes:
     
  6. 300whisper

    300whisper Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    It's all in what you want. I have a duracoat rem 870 express mag for duck hunting. Duracoat is cheap, easy to reapply, and you don't really have to worry about it. The only thing that *Rule 4 Violation*es me off is that it scratches pretty easily and if you rub it against something it will leave a mark. I have two customs that were professionally ceracoated and they are indestructible. The paint quality is much nicer, tougher, and thicker. The only issue is that it was more expensive ( i think 150ish as opposed to $70 for duracoat) and I can't reapply/do touch ups if I do somehow scratch it.
     
  7. 300whisper

    300whisper Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    Just to add...duracoat was professionally painted on as well. It was sprayed on with a paint gun from a compressor from a competent smith. The two customs were professionally sprayed by a different smith, baked in an oven, and then "cured" for about 2 weeks before I got them back. Point is that the level of care for both was equal. So it's an apples to apples comparison.
     
  8. jhibbard24

    jhibbard24 Well-Known Member

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    The big difference that I have personally noticed with do duracoat is the importance of prepping it correctly. Sandblasting metal to ensure good bond. I duracoated a barreled action with my airbrush and he did the prep work to save himself money. I told him I was not responsible for the quality or durability of it, as he only scotchbrited/scuffed it and then washed it down with brake clean. After 20 rnds the muzzle break was flaking off. But another rifle I did (.300 RUM) I sandblasted and then degreased very good and it is holding up just fine.
    The Cerakote process seems so much more costly and then you have to have a way to bake everything. Plus I have no intentions or faith in subjecting a fiberglass , carbon fiber, synthetic stocks to that kind of heat
     
  9. Str8shooterTX

    Str8shooterTX Well-Known Member

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    You couldn't have looked into it that seriously if you didn't know they have an air dry version for just that reason.
    For me the customer satisfaction is important and Cerakote will hands down beat duracoat for any type of durability unless you want it to come off quick. I have worked with both. The only down side is Cerakote doesn't have as many colors in air dry.
     
  10. jhibbard24

    jhibbard24 Well-Known Member

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    I have seen that they have an air dry Cerakote and it comes in maybe a dozen colors. Their website is not very user friendly and quite vague as far as product description and application processes
     
  11. Shane Lindsey

    Shane Lindsey Well-Known Member

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    I did the Duracoat myself ONCE. Sand blasted, cleaned the snot out of it with brake cleaner and acetone. Let it sit for a few weeks prior to shooting. When I cleaned it, the crown started to flake off and show the bare steel. Maybe it didn't cure long enough.

    Now that same rifle wears Ceracoat.
     
  12. Str8shooterTX

    Str8shooterTX Well-Known Member

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    I count 33 just now of high temp cerakote C air dry. Application is just like Duracoat. Prep is blast with aluminum oxide(not bead blasting)
    Not how hard you looked but in thirty seconds I found this ( Cerakote Coatings: Resources Application Training ) showing application info on the website.
    Under the banner Product testing at the top of the page and now at this link you will find all the info you need about durability.
    I'm not sure where you are getting your info about the website but a simple search shows any and all info you could need. I gather you have a reason for not liking cerakote other then the reasons you have listed.
    Bottom line is it is slightly more expensive but the container you get from them is by far larger then what I have gotten from duracoat. This = more applications.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2015
  13. 300whisper

    300whisper Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    Ceracoat is better than duracoat...no argument there. I think what the op is asking what is better as far as application. Duracoat is cheaper and easier to apply, while ceracoate (in my honest opinion) is well worth the extra 120 bucks and to some extent the need for a professional to apply.
     
  14. jhibbard24

    jhibbard24 Well-Known Member

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    Str8shootr what's with coming off like a DICK about the subject and what I was able to find for info. As the OP I asked for unbiased opinions and experiences not for smart *Rule 4 Violation* replies or comments to try and bigot me