Rotator Cuff

zeeman

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After both shoulder surgeries in 2020 I am wondering what would be the easiest drawing compound at around 50-55 pounds . Crossbows just do not agree with me ! Been a Matthews guy since mid 90's and want to continue being an archery hunter of whitetail and maybe one more elk hunt!
 

Muddyboots

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I had complete reconstruction surgery on right shoulder Dec 2018. Bone cyst caused all 4 rotator cuff tendons, bicep tendon to be displaced so had to be attached elsewhere from bone cyst. Torn labrum. Bone spurs. Point is PT got me back so by Oct 2019 I was able to pull 60 lbs without pain. I would recommend a bow in 50-60 range so you can up poundage as you gain strength. Low brace height compounds will have more aggressive cams that can put more stress on shoulder so look at hybrid cams, one cam, high brace height style bows, longer axle to axle. They will give you most ability to draw, more forgiving for tuning. Speed is irrelevant with new bow designs from technology standpoint. I shoot a Hoyt Double XL 60-70 lb and up to 62 now. Hoyt seems to have way more models to look at versus Matthews and I was a Matthews guy forever. But I have orangutan arms so their Double XL fits me best. Don't get caught up in maker and look for the most forgiving bow you can find which will be easiest to draw. One extra suggestion is fixed broadhead since they do not require extra speed to penetrate like a mechanical will need. Lots of good ones out there Thunderhead, Muzzy etc at lighter weights. Example is my son many years ago shot a doe end to end with a 1816 arrow tipped with 85 gr Thunderhead out of a 45 lb Browning Storm bow. I am looking at another surgery on shoulder but waiting until Covid crap is past. Killed 2 does this year with bow so until I cannot draw I will wait. Hang in there and practice will strengthen your shoulders.
 

Hecouldgoalltheway

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I had a full width rotator cuff tear, and a bunch of ligament tearing and bone spurs, arthritis etc, and had a surgery in February. My surgeon called it a very complete destruction of the joint. I figured my compound bow hunting days were over, or at the very least were going to be shelved for a few years. I gave my almost brand new Bear bow to a friend of mine who was in need of a good bow and purchased a x-bow. I went with him to the local bow shop where they adjusted it to fit him and turned it down from 70lbs to 59lbs so he could draw it comfortably. I was afraid to attempt to draw it because I was a few months out of surgery, and still dealing with some pain, but I had a couple of beers and gave it a go. I drew it easily. Then I drew one at 70lb easily. I found that my fears were unfounded. It actually didn't put any noticeable pressure on my tender shoulder. I think a proper draw uses almost every muscle in the torso, and may not be as bad on your shoulder as your mind tells you. I am obviously not a medical professional, and this is just anecdotal, but I'll be buying a new bow now, and I expect to be shooting it comfortably at 70lbs draw well within a year of my surgery.
 

Muddyboots

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Spot on! Proper draw mechanics does NOT place stress on shoulder. If done correctly, a lot of the load is transferred to back muscles. Elbow horizontal to ground will transfer load, decrease bicep tears, increases static strength during hold. Takes time to learn, builds muscle memory, easier on entire draw cycle. If you are not aware of proper draw technique, highly recommend you get to someone who does. Huge advantage!
 

Doublezranch

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I have bilateral reverse total shoulders. Although it was by far the best decision I have ever made to have the surgeries, I also understood that there were a few things I couldn’t do anymore if I wanted the poly to last.
I loved bow hunting but realized it was something that I could give up and go to crossbow. I know that I could probably pull back my 70# Matthews, but it’s not a chance I’m willing to take. I do believe that crossbows are cheating, but boy are they fun.
I had my shoulder surgeries when I was 42. I’m 45 now. Had my right one done in the summer. Filled all my fall tags. Then had my left on done that winter. You never really know how much pain your in until it’s gone.
 

Muddyboots

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DoubleZ: shoulders control your sleep cycle or lack of one😂. Best friend had same surgery as yours and switched to xbow and like you misses his Matthews but can still "bowhunt". I have a xbow and use when shoulder says no for a while. Fun to shoot but glad I still can shoot my Hoyt. Have you considered trying 50lbs in a Matthews? Technology today is so good even 50 lbs shoots extremely well.
 

WYOHTF

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Wyoming
I damaged my cuff on my right shoulder in 2016, they said I needed immediate surgery, the need to hang on to my logging equipment made me keep working, had 0 insurance at the time.
I sold my BowTech
In Wyoming you are allowed to use a crossbow during archery, that’s what I’ve currently been doing
But.... the smoothest drawing bow I ever owned or shot was an ol’ School Mathews single cam
It was there first 32” bow
I think it was the MQ 32 ultra light.
I even put an overdraw on it.
I’m looking for another one because crossbows, imho, are to metro for me
 

Doublezranch

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I have considered. There are so many things i feel like I can do but have to rein in my thoughts sometimes. I feel great and haven’t slept this good in many years. I just don’t want to go backwards.
Going from biological joints to mechanical is just as much a mind game as anything. You have to have the mentality like this, you wouldn’t sit at a red light in your truck and pin the accelerator until the light turns green. You know that the excessive wear will wear internals out quicker. I shoot large bore rifles and love it. Always have. I’ll trade my bow for my big bores.
 

Ranger Rick

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Your surgeon and your physical therapist will verify your shoulder’s mechanics, range of motion, and strength. Let them know you’re a bow hunter. The PT will confirm that one’s shoulder is used in drawing back a bow.
IMO, the engineering of a compound bow is fairly basic such that longer axle-to-axle (33-36”) bows with parallel limbs draw easier. Some smooth drawing bows are Mathews Solo Cam or NoCam, PSE CF Air Steath SE, and what experienced archery shop owners (more than one) recommend.
I had extensive R shoulder surgery in May and my recovery is in the 12 -15 month range. Right now I’m 7 months out and 24/7 my shoulder is killing me. Thank the Lord I retired in March. I did not hunt this year (includes the late season rifle hunts).
Everyone is different ... the bow recommendations are helpful, but the shoulder surgery people can only offer their personal experience. DR’a &. PT’s are the experts. May God bless you with a successful recovery and a wonderful 2021
 

Muddyboots

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I will tell you my surgeon actually knew the proper technique to draw a bow and SHE was not a hunter at all. Seems she had attended an Ortho conference in which one of the breakout sessions on various surgery techniques was about archers and shoulders. She knew about proper transfer to back etc and in much greater physiology detail than anyone could imagine. Unfortunately she recently moved out of area so I need to find another surgeon as good as she was on understanding archery! My PT also had machines that could be altered to simulate drawing a bow which was great to add in for the rehab. Pretty lucky I guess on surgeon and think I have found another one from a reference from my PT place.
 

Orange Dust

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Seems like the ticket would be to find an old pearson advantage. Outlawed for 3D, and dropped from the line. You could shoot a 40# bow with an effective way of around 70# due to the extra pulleys. I used to have one and they are very smooth. A little heavy though.
 

FEENIX

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Great Falls, MT
After both shoulder surgeries in 2020 I am wondering what would be the easiest drawing compound at around 50-55 pounds . Crossbows just do not agree with me ! Been a Matthews guy since mid 90's and want to continue being an archery hunter of whitetail and maybe one more elk hunt!
The better question is how was recovery. I know a guy (not a bowhunter) that had a similar surgery but did not follow his physical therapy, and his range of motion is barely half. I had rotary cuff surgery in June of 2012 (https://www.longrangehunting.com/threads/had-shoulder-surgery.93972/) and was bowhunting by September. I went from 62 lbs down to 50 lbs. I also change the way I pull it (closer to my body instead of arching it). Good luck!
 

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