Rotator Cuff

zeeman

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Joined
Jan 8, 2009
Messages
137
Location
Western PA
One shoulder done in Feb 2020 and the other in June 2020. Actually feeling great, PT went great and feel I could pull 65 # But quite tentative mentally and the surgeon advised against it ?? I feel in a couple more monthsI will be 100 %
 

SArnold30

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Joined
Apr 1, 2020
Messages
54
Location
California
I am not a bow hunter, but I have several years experience in orthopedic rehabilitation and I am currently earning my doctorate in physical therapy, so only take me partly seriously. Here are what I think might be some helpful and encouraging points for you to consider:

- Your rotator cuff's (RC) primary purpose is to produce rotation of the upper arm (think more like throwing or swimming motions), and to keep the bone of the upper arm stabilized onto your shoulder blade.
- In a draw, there is minimal rotation of the upper arm, it's not a windup motion like you're throwing a pitch, so... it is your deltoids, pectorals, and biceps, not your RC, that are primarily responsible for getting the upper arm horizontal and parallel to the ground
-The other muscles mostly responsible for your draw mechanics are not part of your RC complex; rather your lats, teres major, and deltoids are
- The muscles acting on your shoulder blade (traps, rhomboids, serratus anterior, and levator scapulae) are the MOST important. The muscles of the RC all originate from the shoulder blade, so if the muscles actually moving the shoulder blade don't work well, it cannot move into the correct position to allow your RC to function properly, and you get faulty shoulder mechanics, which is probably how you came to encounter RC issues, or other injuries, in the first place.

Overall, your RC isn't responsible for getting you to full draw, but it does play a massive part in dynamically stabilizing your arm in that spot once you get there, and it helps while you hold for the shot. If you have surgical repair, the RC is after all only a group of four muscles and their tendons, so it heals fairly well (labrum, ligament, and bursa issues are another topic). Follow your surgeon's advice and go to your PT appointments. Getting your range of motion back is the first step, but you will eventually regain full strength of the muscles actually needed for the draw. Your PT will also get the muscles acting on the shoulder blade to adequately function, then your RC is in a favorable position, and then they'll rehab your RC so that it can maintain your draw. It won't happen overnight, but if you do your part, you'll get back to bow hunting sooner than you think. Treat your rehab as seriously as your hunting, and you will probably have improved mechanics when you're ready.
 

Ranger Rick

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Joined
Sep 6, 2019
Messages
501
Location
Idaho
I am not a bow hunter, but I have several years experience in orthopedic rehabilitation and I am currently earning my doctorate in physical therapy, so only take me partly seriously. Here are what I think might be some helpful and encouraging points for you to consider:

- Your rotator cuff's (RC) primary purpose is to produce rotation of the upper arm (think more like throwing or swimming motions), and to keep the bone of the upper arm stabilized onto your shoulder blade.
- In a draw, there is minimal rotation of the upper arm, it's not a windup motion like you're throwing a pitch, so... it is your deltoids, pectorals, and biceps, not your RC, that are primarily responsible for getting the upper arm horizontal and parallel to the ground
-The other muscles mostly responsible for your draw mechanics are not part of your RC complex; rather your lats, teres major, and deltoids are
- The muscles acting on your shoulder blade (traps, rhomboids, serratus anterior, and levator scapulae) are the MOST important. The muscles of the RC all originate from the shoulder blade, so if the muscles actually moving the shoulder blade don't work well, it cannot move into the correct position to allow your RC to function properly, and you get faulty shoulder mechanics, which is probably how you came to encounter RC issues, or other injuries, in the first place.

Overall, your RC isn't responsible for getting you to full draw, but it does play a massive part in dynamically stabilizing your arm in that spot once you get there, and it helps while you hold for the shot. If you have surgical repair, the RC is after all only a group of four muscles and their tendons, so it heals fairly well (labrum, ligament, and bursa issues are another topic). Follow your surgeon's advice and go to your PT appointments. Getting your range of motion back is the first step, but you will eventually regain full strength of the muscles actually needed for the draw. Your PT will also get the muscles acting on the shoulder blade to adequately function, then your RC is in a favorable position, and then they'll rehab your RC so that it can maintain your draw. It won't happen overnight, but if you do your part, you'll get back to bow hunting sooner than you think. Treat your rehab as seriously as your hunting, and you will probably have improved mechanics when you're ready.
Thank you; however, I’ve had two shoulder surgeons say that “rotator” is a misnomer as the RC has four sets of muscles and tendons that primarily support multiple movements of the shoulder and interact with ones biceps, triceps, chest, neck and back. Recovery primarily depends on the surgery performed. Post-op caution, treatment & PT are essential and prescribed based on the individual’s anatomy and the surgery. One shoe does not fit all.
 

SArnold30

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Joined
Apr 1, 2020
Messages
54
Location
California
Thank you; however, I’ve had two shoulder surgeons say that “rotator” is a misnomer as the RC has four sets of muscles and tendons that primarily support multiple movements of the shoulder and interact with ones biceps, triceps, chest, neck and back. Recovery primarily depends on the surgery performed. Post-op caution, treatment & PT are essential and prescribed based on the individual’s anatomy and the surgery. One shoe does not fit all.
Yes, that is essentially what I just said: the RC is a synergistic complex. Each of the four muscles within do in fact provide specific movements, to primarily include rotation; but it exists to help support these larger movements that are otherwise being performed by different muscle groups. It is not the be-all end-all of shoulder function. As I also said, other issues notwithstanding affect your recovery process.
 

Ranger Rick

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Joined
Sep 6, 2019
Messages
501
Location
Idaho
Yes, that is essentially what I just said: the RC is a synergistic complex. Each of the four muscles within do in fact provide specific movements, to primarily include rotation; but it exists to help support these larger movements that are otherwise being performed by different muscle groups. It is not the be-all end-all of shoulder function. As I also said, other issues notwithstanding affect your recovery process.
OK, but neither MD said shoulder rotation was the RC’s primary role. I’m relying on them. ✌️
 

SArnold30

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Joined
Apr 1, 2020
Messages
54
Location
California
You can rely on whomever, we've all said the same thing and it still hasn't stopped you from missing the point: individually, the muscles of the RC can and do work to produce movement in multiple planes. Collectively, the RC serves to stabilize the head of the humerus onto the glenoid fossa so that the shoulder articulates properly.
 

Ranger Rick

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Joined
Sep 6, 2019
Messages
501
Location
Idaho
You can rely on whomever, we've all said the same thing and it still hasn't stopped you from missing the point: individually, the muscles of the RC can and do work to produce movement in multiple planes. Collectively, the RC serves to stabilize the head of the humerus onto the glenoid fossa so that the shoulder articulates properly.
I’m not relying on you, especially since you can’t admit you’re wrong by saying QUOTE: “Your rotator cuff's (RC) primary purpose is to produce rotation of the upper arm.” Now settle back down in California and work harder on your doctorate. This OP was by a bow hunter, and I’ve been successfully bow hunting since 1985. Plus I had extensive shoulder surgery in May of this year. You should have not opined. Ad-flipping-mit it! PS I got my doctorate in 1990, because of your pompousness, I just said so for the first time in this forum.
 

SArnold30

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Joined
Apr 1, 2020
Messages
54
Location
California
Omitting the second half of my sentence "and to keep the bone of the upper arm stabilized onto your shoulder blade" doesn't make you right. Not my fault that you can't fathom that a structure might have two primary functions, and that the individual components of a system should be introduced before the whole; which is why I worded my response in that manner. And please, put your dong away, I didn't come here to get in a ****ing match; I'm just trying to combine two things I'm passionate about to encourage others, because the topic of the injury is clearly an issue among fellow hunters. Then you came along.
 

deaddownrange

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Joined
May 20, 2019
Messages
47
Location
middle of montana
Tore mine 3 years ago, had surgery and was told it was "unrepairable " still hurts,get steroid shot every 3 months helps some, I think my bow hunting days are over. Anybody bowhunt after shoulder replacement surgery?
 

Tree Farmer

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Joined
Dec 30, 2013
Messages
141
I’m not relying on you, especially since you can’t admit you’re wrong by saying QUOTE: “Your rotator cuff's (RC) primary purpose is to produce rotation of the upper arm.” Now settle back down in California and work harder on your doctorate. This OP was by a bow hunter, and I’ve been successfully bow hunting since 1985. Plus I had extensive shoulder surgery in May of this year. You should have not opined. Ad-flipping-mit it! PS I got my doctorate in 1990, because of your pompousness, I just said so for the first time in this forum.
 

FEENIX

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Dec 20, 2008
Messages
16,726
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Great Falls, MT
Wow. Heck of an education. All I can say is when my rc was torn it hurt like hell. Layman's terms
Yep! Mine too. Luckily, my orthopedic surgeon and physical therapist (who also has a doctorate degree and had the same issue as I did) are bowhunters.
 
Last edited:

aalyea

Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2013
Messages
14
Location
Eastern WA/MT
I am an Orthopaedic surgeon and avid bow hunter for many years. What I would like to add is that there is a huge spectrum of cuff tears ranging from easy fix (still long rehab) to not repairable. Bottom line is finds doc you trust and will listen to you, then listen to them. Be patient and persistent with your rehab to get all you can.
when I injured my right shoulder I found after rehab the Bowtech SS had a much more comfortable draw cycle compared to many others.
 
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