Floorless tents and tarps

NYSHUNTER

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I'm torn between Kirafru saw tooth or super tarp and also Seekoutside BT-2 with nest .. Does anyone have any experience with anyone of these shelters ?
 

pyroducksx3

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I can tell you the kifaru will never let you down. The sawtooth is an amazing two person shelter. I've even seen pictures of people using cots in them. If you are going to be hunting 2 plus a stove the super tarp isn't really even an option. For one person the super tarp is a great option.
 

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pyroducksx3

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The super tarp excels when camping in smaller areas like deer beds and close to spotting locations while using a bivy and like i said solo use. If you are looking for a tarp for two the mega is a good option. I've heard from a trusted source that the mega is getting a little update and it will be an easier setup.
 

zdr

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I know folks who use a sawtooth and it is a comfortable lite weight shelter for 2.

For those cold late fall colorado elk hunts, it's hard to beat a 8 or 12 man tipi and stove...
 

NYSHUNTER

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I really like the nest feature of bt-2 seek outside but that mega tarp looks amazing and my plan is to hike for the trail and either set up a quick camp or bivy camp as far as late season hunting all 3 options have stove jacks ... I was just wondering sleeping in the floorless style shelter what's the pros and cons ?

BTW Guys thanks for the input
 

Timber338

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I'm also curious how a tarp would hold up in a big storm. Does it keep out the elements or can rain/snow blow in from the sides?

Seems like a small tent with rain fly would hold in more heat and hold out more moisture. But I've also never tried a tarp and Kifaru makes awesome gear...
 

NYSHUNTER

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Timber,

That's my major concern .. That's the reason I'm leaning toward the seek outside cause they have a inner liner they call the nest that looks like a tub with mesh on it
 

Mike 338

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You get dirtier in a floorless. After a week, you can look like you've been rolling around in dirt because you have. If you have a stove, it's a very fair tradeoff. Wind can get under the floorless but again, with a stove, your still warm. With a stove, you can start your morning or fix dinner in a tee shirt instead of racing into your bag to get warm. Floorless/Stove can still be bulky to pack, isn't lightweight and takes longer to setup/take down but could be worth it, particularly in cooler temperatures or degrading weather. Bugs are less of an issue in cold weather. Teepee style tents have storage space but headroom is sparse and the stove is usually in the middle about where you'd stand so you loose some space there. You get around the tent on your hands and knees in the dirt but it's not to bad and for more space, get a bigger tent. Firewood takes up space in the tent. I have an older Kifaru 3-man which I like very much and use on solo hunts. I'd want something bigger with two men and some gear. If I needed to spike for a night or two, a regular tarp is quite adequate but should foul weather hit, I'd want a tent.
 

NYSHUNTER

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So in a CO late season hunt with the wind howling and the snow falling you will still go with a tipi style and stove ?
 

zdr

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I can only tell you my experience with my 12 man tipi and a 4 person Mountain Hardware Kiva. I've been in some rough weather in Colorado and New Mexico and never had an issue with wind or water IF the shelter is pitched and staked properly. I carry a lightweight tarp for a floor and with the stove, it is super comfortable in cold conditions.
On one Colorado late fall elk hunt we had temperatures just above zero at night and the Tipi was incredibly warm with the stove going - 70' at least. Without the stove going, it was frosty:) but I cant say it was much if any colder than a regular backpacking tent.

z
 

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FAIRCHASE

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Been using a kifaru 8-man, sawtooth and super tarp (w/annex) for many years. All three have their specific use and have seen some major weather extremes and I have never been let down. I have never wished I was in a floored shelter. I spend time in the mountains year round.

Interesting and true ............ those that are pro floorless shelters have spent significant time using them and those that are not in favor of the floorless shelters have spent little to ZERO time using one.

I have introduced several people to the floorless shelters who became fans.

I am a fan of the Kifaru shleters but there are a couple others in the market that I would not hesitate to buy from.
 

NYSHUNTER

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What about in warm weather ? With all the bugs flying around

Seek outside has a nest does kirafu have anything like that ? I am leaning toward the sawtooth with stove or megatarp with stove and annex but the BT-2 has a lot of rev same features and the nest adds a pound but protects you from those bugs in warm weather
 

FAIRCHASE

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The kifaru tipis offer a removable zippered screen for the doors. I have only used mine a handful of times.

No first hand experience using the SO shelters but I have heard nothing but good things.

Not trying to sell anyone on the floorless tipis but rather share my experiences using three shelters over several years and in all of the extreme elements MT (mts and eastern plains) has to offer. No shelter system is perfect but I have no intentions in ever reverting back to a floored shelter.

Regarding bugs, the only time I would probably want a floored shelter would be if I ever find myself in a tropical jungle.

As a side comment, there are a few places I explored in MT where finding a small flat area is near impossible and this weekend I will be using a hammock sleeping system for the first time. Check out the Amok Draumr 2.0 for the details. I am skeptical of sleeping in a hammock but so far I am impressed with my backyard adventures :D
 

Mike 338

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So in a CO late season hunt with the wind howling and the snow falling you will still go with a tipi style and stove ?
Tipi's are a stable shape and deflect wind as well and sometimes better than other designs. These are tents and not cabins so you'll still need to do something with the snow when it builds up to much but a tipi is plenty sturdy in both wind and snow and the manufacturers that have been mentioned are good. I think because of the lack of a floor, you might get a little more condensation inside. I find a tipi/stove to be a preferred set up for late season because 1) the sun rises later and sets earlier so your in your tent more 2) because it's warm inside the tent, you don't need to stay in your bag 3) because your comfortable in your tent for extra hours, you can and will attend to little chores that sometimes get neglected because you were in your bag staying warm. Chores can include taking care of your feet, drying your socks, heating water on the stove to make warm drinks to stay hydrated, getting tomorrows lunch ready the night before so you don't have to do it in the morning, take a sponge bath cause you stink 4) the stove, if it's flat on top, lets you heat a pot of water for cooking while you heat other items with you backpacking stove. 5) once the stove is going, the tent warms quickly and you can get out of your heavy coat which is quite a bit more comfortable 6) organize your pack, change batteries before they go out, refill your canteen/bladder without getting your gloves wet. 6) they say you can dry your clothes and that may be but I don't run the stove any more than I need it. Once I'm in my bag, I don't touch the stove till morning.

Cons might be: 1) weight & set up time 2) finding wood 3) sharing your tent with wood 4) wet floor (I use tyvek under my bag) 5) condensation 6) tending the fire every 10 to 15 minutes 7) lack of headroom 8) you'll probably see a bug or two in your tent

All in all, for me the pro's outweigh the cons for a late season setup.
 

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