Checkering tools

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by Hicks, May 23, 2019.


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  1. Hicks

    Hicks Well-Known Member

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    Hi guys,

    What exact checkering tools will I need to freshen up the checkering on a factory BDL stock? I'm not sure I want a whole kit as I'm just going to do the one stock right now.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Dosh

    Dosh Well-Known Member

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    Aug 6, 2013
    H, you will need to know how many lines per inch before ordering a tool. The Ramelson tools have been good for me to freshen checkering. There are some expert checkering knowledge on this forum. Perhaps one will have more help than I.
     
  3. Ckgworks

    Ckgworks Well-Known Member

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    Not an expert, but I have done a bit of checkering. Depending on how bad it is, I normally use a "riffling file" for light clean up, or a single line tool followed up with the riffling file. I would recommend getting the short reverse cut tool as well for your edges if you haven't done much checkering. I also have a riffling file that I snapped the point off, and it works very well for getting up to your borders without cutting over them.
    If you are using a single cutter tool, spacing per inch should't matter, but be aware there are 60 degree checkers and 90 degree cutter (the angle between the diamonds) I use 60 deg, and they should clean up a factory checkering job. If you want to cut more than one line at a time, than yes spacing will matter. You don't "need" a complete kit, but if you ever want to checker from scratch, you will need the whole kit...... Hope that helps.
     
  4. Hicks

    Hicks Well-Known Member

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  5. Hicks

    Hicks Well-Known Member

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  6. Ckgworks

    Ckgworks Well-Known Member

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    Yes, that would be the bare minimum......for general touch up, I'd probably go with "fine" on your cutter.