How much Energy is needed to take an hog ?

Discussion in 'Hog Hunting' started by lrbeginner, Feb 13, 2012.

  1. lrbeginner

    lrbeginner Member

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    How much energy is needed to take an 210-230 lb hog
     
  2. kc

    kc Well-Known Member

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    the guys I know in Texas say a 165 to 180..they are tough in a .3006, I have used a 165gr in a 7mag it worked the only problem as soon as the shooting started they went hiding.
    What calibre are you using?
    if you plan to take out the .22-250 stay home, all you will do is piss them off.
    I am loading some 165 accubond, some bullets won't go deep enough to do any damage.
    I don't remember the town in Texas but they have signs asking hunters to kill there wild hogs.
     

  3. thehulk

    thehulk Well-Known Member

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    I disagree about the .22-250

    The smaller the round, the less room for error on shot placement, I've seen hogs dropped with a 22mag in the ear. Shoot a big caliber and you can shoot them just about anywhere and manage a kill. Buddy of mine just used his .223 to take a hog, granted 3 shots, but hey....

    There isnt a set amount of energy needed,but it helps to have more than 1,000ftlbs when shooting a big/tough animal like a hog.
     
  4. Stormrider

    Stormrider Well-Known Member

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    Not much. A 22lr will do with good shot placement... (grin) I've shot pigs with a 300 Whisper with a 173g bullets at ~1600-1700 f/s. Went through the pig the long way.

    Pretty much anything you want to shoot them with will work with good shot placement.
     
  5. kc

    kc Well-Known Member

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    To the HULK.
    If the .22-250 works for you, good luck! I hope you have lots of kill shots just ga careful.
     
  6. brentdrake

    brentdrake Active Member

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    I never shoot a large animal without at least 1,000flbs of energy. So different calibers have different maximum ranges.
     
  7. threejones

    threejones Well-Known Member

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    My Texas in-laws figure that the same rule of thumb for deer aplies to hogs. At least 1000#, the less the energy the better your shot placement needs to be. It sounds like it's more a matter of how ballsy you are as the caliber gets smaller. I'll be using my 6.8SPC next month in the DFW area (if all goes well anyway) and I'm still not 100% sure it's enough.
    Cody
     
  8. kc

    kc Well-Known Member

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    I should always remember there are people who can shoot a heckova lot better than me.
     
  9. aggie99

    aggie99 Well-Known Member

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    I live and hunt in east Texas and have killed more pigs than I would care to count. I have used recurve bows, compound bows, 9mm, 22 mag, 22-250, 25-06, 6.5x55, 30-30, 30-06 etc. and all are more than capable of killing pigs. Some how pigs have gained an almost mythical ability to survive any cartridge and that is not the case. If you can hit the vitals they will die the same as any other animal so just pick your favorite weapon and help us thin the herd.
     
  10. curtis

    curtis Well-Known Member

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    If I'm using a .25-06 w/ a 100 gr Remington Cor-lokt to go hog hunting and I see a hog at...let's say 100 yards, do I need to wait for a quartering away shot to get the bullet up into the vitals (missing the shield) or will I be OK busting through the shield, into the vitals at a broadside shot?
     
  11. aggie99

    aggie99 Well-Known Member

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    The shield would only be a problem on very large males. The largest boar I have ever shot (far too large to put in the truck) was about 250 yards and quartering to me. The 30 cal entrance wound looked like a large exit wound but he was DRT. On the average hog either shot will be effective.

    Taken with a Ruger #1 in 25-06 at about 175-200 yards. He was quartering hard to me. The entrance wound was about 2-3 inches behind and slightly below the ear. He kicked for a minute but never took another step.
     

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  12. 35RShooter

    35RShooter New Member

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    I personally am not a fan of 22 caliber rounds for anything bigger than a coyote. When i pig hunt back in Florida i use either my .308 or 35 Rem. Any cartridge .243 or up will be sufficient given proper shot placement within a reasonable yardage. Happy hunting. 35RShooter. :cool:
     
  13. nateisw

    nateisw Well-Known Member

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    Anything comparable to .243 or above should have sufficient power to take any size hog at any reasonable distance with good shot placement. In Hawaii, the rule is anything greater than 1,200 ft/lbs ME, so .223's are legal. I personally use a 7mm rem mag on hogs, but my cousin uses a 30-30 and my coworker uses a .270. At very close range, even a .22 lr can put a big hog down in one shot, but I wouldn't chance it.
     
  14. Twanger

    Twanger Well-Known Member

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    Talking to the outfitter for the hog hunt we just completed he said a 7.62X39 is about the smallest he recommended.
    We had one of those in our group and it worked just dandy on the 50-pound boar that it took.

    Our group brought a .308 (mine), two 7.5X55 Swiss SK's, and a 300-mag. These were all more than adequate.