How long for a custom build?

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by scoutm, Apr 27, 2012.

  1. <6 weeks

    9 vote(s)
    9.5%
  2. 6 - 18 weeks

    16 vote(s)
    16.8%
  3. 18-24 weeks

    19 vote(s)
    20.0%
  4. > 24 weeks

    51 vote(s)
    53.7%
  1. scoutm

    scoutm Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    83
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2009
    I'm curious as to that the average time for a custom build is assuming a few factors:

    1. You are using a reputable well reviewed gunsmith
    2. You deliver all the parts necessary to complete the build at the same time so there's no waiting on parts
    3. You are using realtively common caliber so no wait on a reamer
    4. You use common actions so blue printing isn't unusual
    5. You want relatively common tasks completed - true action, cut, chamber, thread and crown barrel, tune trigger, glass bed and free float barreled action and coat the action with coating of your choice.
    What do you think is the norm?
     

  2. grit

    grit Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,375
    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    I don't think there is a "norm". I'm a new shop, open full time since Christmas. I can do a full build in a month. This is partly due to being new, partly due to my goal of keeping the back log managed.

    It's not uncommon to see a year plus back log with small, or very popular, custom shops. Some of the more commercial outfits keep back log down too.
     

  3. Boss Hoss

    Boss Hoss Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,843
    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2005
    There really is no standard---I have had a few rifles built in 2 days from non fluted/chambered blank plus dies and non inletted stock blank complete ground up build including fitting Wyatt Box and HS bottom metal to 2 years. Depends on your Smith and your relationship. Find the best and stick with them! Never hurts when they are good friends lol.
     
  4. scoutm

    scoutm Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    83
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2009

    "norm" was a bad choice of words. What I was really trying to get at is what can one reasonably expect in the scenario I described.
     
  5. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

    Messages:
    8,853
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    24 weeks ain't even 1/2 enough has been my experience, except for the last one which was sell under 24 days.

    I took that one to grit...
     
  6. Archery1973

    Archery1973 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    143
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2012
    16-24 weeks for my McMillan EOL Outdoorsman and Les Baer sniper rifle.
     
  7. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,257
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2004

    As far as actual machine time and bedding you are talking about two weeks +/-.

    Next scenario= if you furnish everything needed to the smith add the 2 weeks to his back log
    and that should get you close.

    The third scenario= if he has to order a barrel and/or a stock you can figure 3 Months + 2 weeks.

    If he has lots of work and does nor manage his time well or do every ones project in the order
    of placement it can be a year or more.

    The best way to expedite your rifle build is to talk to the preferred Smith and have all of your
    componants in hand, get him to give you a schedule, and DONT GIVE HIM ALL THE MONEY
    up front. (This takes away the incentive for him to finish on time).

    If he will not take partial payment with the other half upon completion, "RUN". I just finished
    a rifle for someone that was in the gunsmiths shop for over 7 years, (He paid everything up front)
    and when he went to pick it up and did not have a receipt to prove he had paid in advance
    he couldn't recover any of his money.

    A smith can't lose if you furnish everything because if you back out and he has started or
    completed it he has the rifle and can recover his money buy selling it.

    So the answer is what ever you agree on with the smith that he will honor

    J E CUSTOM
     
  8. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,989
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    If the customer provides "everything", including the receiver, a 'gunsmith' can not sell that fiream as there is no transfer of ownership in this situation. It does not belong to the gunsmith, it still belongs to the customer. The law (and ATFE) would consider that "stealing/selling a stolen firearm". A gunsmith can loose! Keep a good 'paper trail'(e-mails, notes included with parts shipments) so no one gets hurt. He's trusting you to follow through on your end, as much as you are trusting him to supply you with what you asked for!
     
  9. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,257
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2004

    Good point Shortgrass !!

    Fortunately I have never had this come up. All have been happy and been glad to pick up there rifle.

    I think the simple thing for the smith is to do what he said he would do and deliver it on time.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  10. scoutm

    scoutm Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    83
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2009
    Thanks for the feedback. No matter what it appears that the custom gun process is a hurry up and wait game. Probably a good thing that it is otherwise I could end up being rather poor.
     
  11. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,989
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Lucky you. I'm sitting on a couple (or three) jobs with parts (including customer owned receivers, some for over a year) and labor worth several $$$$$$$$. I realize things can change for folks, sometimes rather quickly in todays economic climate. Even a phone call would be nice, so I'd have half an idea what to expect.
     
  12. phpd1295

    phpd1295 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    107
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2011
    Hello all.
    I am the winner of the long range hunting March Manners stock contest. I am looking for a gunsmith to work on my build. I have an old (1988) remington 700 bdl in 243. This rifle is left handed short action and I was never able to get it to shoot well. I am looking to get it re-barreled in 300 wsm (I already have a 308 in right hand) and get the action trued up. I ordered the manners MCS-T4A stock in LH Remington 700 SA. Since I won the stock from this site I thought it would be best to get this sites input on where to get the work done and what to get done.
    I had some advice from a local amateur gunsmith because I needed to order the stock to fit the build. Based on his recommendations I ordered the stock to fit a Tubbs oversize recoil lug, M-40 barrel contour, and get the pillars installed.
    Any opinions and suggestions are welcome.
    Thanks,
    Bill
     
  13. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

    Messages:
    6,848
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2004
    Right now on current orders I tell my customers 12-14 months. I have been as long as 26-28 months which is WAY to long but working hard to get shipping times down even more by streamlining options on rifles I provide now that there is enough business to allow me to do that.

    Keep these things in mind:

    - Top grade custom barrel will take 10-24 weeks to get in from time of order depending on maker on averge.

    - Most custom receivers, if new orders will often take 3 to 6 months.

    - If you order a custom made stock for you, you will be looking at 2 to 8 months as well.

    Even if all parts are in stock and supplied to a rifle builder, it may take another 4-6 months simply get through the other work orders to start your project. If someone has been building rifles for many years and they tell you they can get a full custom rifle built for you in under 24 weeks, either they have an entire shop full of employees or they are not making very many rifles and there is probably a reason for the later.

    If the builder has been in business for many years and has a long back log, there is a reason for it. Good reputations take years to develope and take alot of good rifles to maintain as well.

    If you think 24 weeks is to long to wait for a full custom rifle, you will be better off buying a top end factory rifle. The quality of the rifle will not be as good but it will save you and the builder alot of greif if you are not willing to put in the patients for a world class rifle.
     
  14. D.ID

    D.ID Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    838
    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2008
    With the right action, all the parts and some devcon. I will start mine tonight and be shooting tomorrow....................Savage................ SORRY, Couldn't help it, mother forgive me.