How to build a LR gun, revisited.

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by Guest, Nov 16, 2001.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Hi,
    Kind of trying to keep everyone posted on where I'm at with my Savage.
    The barrel came in a few days ago, and I already had received the barrel vise from Midway. Changing the barrel took about 30 minutes. The barrel is 27", with a straight taper to .825".
    I only ran in to two problems. The Choate sniper stock was never designed for a magazine box big enough to hold a 300 RUM. I never knew that aluminum was so hard to work with till I went after it with a Dremel tool. That 1/8" was a pain. The other problem is going to be a little harder. The stock uses a V-block bedding system, and that means that as you tighten down the bedding screws, it kind of pinchs the action. It's no big thing with my other savages, but with this one, it causes the shell ejector rod (bracket?) to bind if I tighten the rear action screw much over snug. It's probabily caused by how much metal they carved out of the bottom of the action to get the cases to clear and feed. I think I'm going to have to fix that one by glass bedding it.
    However, I at least got to fire it today. Factory ammo, but that will change shortly. I only fired one round because I didn't have the scope mounted yet, and I REALLY wanted to shoot it. Of course, then I got to come home and clean it. It had no copper fouling at all. I then put on the scope and stuck the bipod on it. After filling the grip with 147 grain FMJ's, my bathroom scales say it weighs 17#. That should give me a recoil of about 23#.
    And now a question. I've got about $200 to spend on a cronograph. Anybody got any recomendations?

    I'll post more when I get some groups, etc..

    Good shooting.
    C'ya. JP.
     
  2. Ian M

    Ian M Well-Known Member

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    Jeeper,
    My suggestion regarding the chronograph is to save up another 200 or so and buy an Oehler model 35P and a set of their stands.

    There are other chronographs out there that work and they are cheaper, but they do not guarantee the longevity and back-up that you get with Oehler, plus the excellent reliability and accuracy.

    You will enjoy using the chronograph a lot so why not use the industry standard. I use 35P's a lot and they are just plain reliable. Also they are easy to rebuild when you drift a slug through all three screens. All you need is some simple tools and spare parts which are very cheap.

    Good luck.
    ian
     

  3. Brent

    Brent Well-Known Member

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    Spend the money on the Oehler 35P, after 2 Chrony brand models that both read different as much as 150 fps and regularly 50-100fps off I've seen the light.

    The Oehler 35P is 2 in 1 also. I'm ordering one next week with the stands and case.

    Who has the best deal out there you've seen?

    Brent

    [ 11-17-2001: Message edited by: Brent ]
     
  4. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Hi,
    I just got through looking at Natchezss.com, as I was expecting the answers I've got so far. The Oehler 35 is on sale for $220, and the 35P is $344. So, what would make the 35P so much better ($120), just because it's got a printer? What's the deal?

    TIA.
    C'ya. John.
     
  5. Ian M

    Ian M Well-Known Member

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    Jeeper,
    Only difference is the printer and it is worth having. You can also order direct from Oehler, particularly for spare parts. You really should have some spare bodies and light diffuser parts, they are very cheap. Oehler has the simplest, most reasonably priced stands and also a good carrying case I believe.

    I regularly use two 35P's as I set a second system downrange to get actual downrange velocities. Makes for interesting shooting - have shot through both sets of screens simultaneously out to 500 yards so far. Fact is I have shot up my screens more at 100 and at the 10" spacing, never hit them yet shooting downrange past 100.

    I do a lot with in-line muzzleloaders as well as centerfire and have a simple angled steel deflector that I put in front of the screens downrange - it has been bowled over a few times but the screens and tripods survived. Also sometimes use a piece of plywood with a slit in it set up in front of the 10' setting so that sabots don't take out the plastic - angle it a bit and the sabots bounce off and away.

    Sabots from in-line bullets (and shotgun slugs) are nasty on the screens and diffusers but I just keep glueing them back together if possible, then replace. As long as you don't hit the little "eye" sensor or snip a wire (did that) the system will work.

    The paper printouts are very useful, save notekeeping at the range. Just jot down each load in the margin of the printout, make better notes back home.

    Plan on carrying everything in a big plastic tool kit or tackle box - you should also have an extra 9 volt battery, spare printer paper, pens, tape measure (to get your distance from the muzzle), a cheap carpenter's level to level up the screens, a pair of plyers to loosen the screen wingnut bolts if necessary, and a spare screen body and diffuse parts. I cut a piece of foam to fit the bottom of my tool boxes, make a cutout in it to place the 35P body in, then pile everything on and around it.

    You will find that the more parrallel your screens are to the flight of the bullet the more consistent and accurate your readings are. You can tell how close to parallel you are by examining the two readings after a shot - they should be only a few feet per second apart. By adjusting your screens up and down with the level you can frequently get readings that are only a couple of feet apart.

    If they are too far off the computer will warn you as the display will flash on and off. Sometimes this also means that you did not get into the receptive area that the sensor is working.

    Battery life is very good, you will know when to change batteries as the printer noticeably slows down. The little battery cover is the only pain in the butt in the entire system - at least on my systems the covers don't stay in place so I tape them shut. Printers seem to last forever, I have had my units for years and they are still printing clearly. Understand that they are serviceable - haven't had to do that.

    I hope this info is of interst and that you enjoy your new toy.
    ian
     
  6. Brent

    Brent Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Ian,

    How does it work without the diffusers, does it only need them in direct sunlight on clear days like the Chrony brand chronys?

    Here is another place to get one, you can get the stand and case with it here.
    http://kinneman.com/2001/css/wholecatalog_60.htm

    I will use one of my other chronys down range if it matches the Oehler consistantly, the other will be downrange also but it will be to shoot AT.

    Later
     
  7. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Jeepeer,

    Something that may help you in the future as far as using a "dremel" when "trying" to work with aluminum. Aluminum is very "gummy" as you already found out. What you need is lubrication. If you mix 1/2 kerosene with 1/2 light oil (DTE Light or even marvel oil will work) this will make a good lubricant and cooling agent and make working with aluminum a lot less of a chore. The idea is to lubricate the bit so the aluminum doesn't "stick" in between the cutting edges of the tool. It will also assist in "cooling" the bit. Only downside is the smell [​IMG]

    Don [​IMG]
     
  8. Ian M

    Ian M Well-Known Member

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    Brent,
    I have checked my 35P's against Oehler's big multi-thousand dollar lab unit called the Model 83 and the velocities are bang-on.

    There is also a more sophisticated model called the M43 that will do chamber pressures but it requires a laptop to operate. It can use acustic mic's (super sensitive microphones instead of skyscreens) that utilize the sound wave of the bullet to not only determine speed but the location that each bullet traveled relative to others (it shows your group and group size). The M43 will also work with standard screens. It is a great unit but not as userfriendly as the 35P - more for advanced reloaderholics.

    You don't need the diffusers on overcast days, other than they give you a nice referance point for ensuring your bullets fly through the "zone". I believe the reason that diffusers were designed was because of a problem with a "glint" or hotspot on the nose of certain really polished bullets on bright sunny days that fooled the sensor. The diffuser makes for a bit of shade you might say. I had the predecessor of the 35P called the Model 33 back in the stone-ages and it did not originally have the diffusers. I recall glint problems with Sierra bullets with wonky numbers coming up.

    Simple fact: Orange and black material streaking through your field of view is not good...
     
  9. 308

    308 Well-Known Member

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    I've had very good luck with the Pact MKIV Chrono/Timer. Pact has a sell on them now for 199.95 including shipping and a skyscreen bracket. A printer is available for more $. I'm sure it is not as nice as the oelher but I'm well pleased with mine and it contains a ballistic computer that is handy to have in the field sometimes.
    Pacts phone no is 800-722-8462: 308
     
  10. Ian M

    Ian M Well-Known Member

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    Brent,
    "How does it work without the diffusers, does it only need them in direct sunlight on clear days like the Chrony brand chronys?"

    I do not believe they are necessary on dull days but I like to set them up to have a reference for where to shoot.

    I have never had a problem with my 35P's except for the little battery trapdoor in the bottom breaking - easily fixed with some Scotch tape.

    Hope you enjoy your new toy.