bedding

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by Caleb85, Feb 25, 2014.

  1. Caleb85

    Caleb85 Well-Known Member

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    Hello , I have a new can of bondo brand liquid fiberglass resin ,I was going to use for the top of my reloading bench but I got to thinking could I use this stuff for rifle bedding ? Any info would help ..thanks
     
  2. Caleb85

    Caleb85 Well-Known Member

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    Any info ??
     

  3. Marble

    Marble Well-Known Member

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    The stuff I bought had two parts to it, resin and fiber. I dint think it matters really what you use fiberglass wise, but I'm no expert. The thing I would make sure you do is coat all the metal parts with something to prevent the bedding from adhering to the action and barrel.

    I've done two. One I put pillar beds in, the other I just redid the bedding. Both were rather easy and a lot of fun.
     
  4. Caleb85

    Caleb85 Well-Known Member

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    Thank you Marble!!!!!
     
  5. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    I personally don't recommend using anything that was not made for bedding.

    Some products have solvents that will dissolve release agents gluing the action to the stock.

    Also bedding is designed to have compressive strength and toughness. products that are
    designed for sanding and bonding are not as tough or have the compressive strength.

    Just a recommendation.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  6. Caleb85

    Caleb85 Well-Known Member

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    That's a good point !!! Thank you!! I will just have to refill my Devcon supply..
     
  7. Clark

    Clark Well-Known Member

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    Almost any epoxy will have a compressive strength of about 20 kpsi.

    While the strength is the same, there are variations in viscosity and working time.

    I have used all kinds of epoxies for rifles, and I have settled on Devcon steel putty. With it, I do not have to fight time nor gravity.

    The most important things are that:
    1) the epoxy and catalyst are warm enough at the time they are mixed
    2) the epoxy and catalyst are still good so they will still go off. If they are a couple years old, test first.
    3) be ready before mixing. I do a dry run where I practice the process without the epoxy.
     
  8. Marble

    Marble Well-Known Member

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    I really enjoyed bedding two of my rifles, I think I will have to bed another this next week just because! It's an a bolt 2 and I was planning on doing the trigger spring s on it and another so I might as well do them all.

    Thanks to those who also contributed to the thread.
     
  9. pmh-usa

    pmh-usa Well-Known Member

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    I have bedded with just about everything including fiberglas resin - it's very runny and you must add floc or chopped fiberglas to thicken it but as pointed out it has very limited shelf-life and that period of time is not always as predictable as the manufacturers would like us to believe - usually its the hardener/catalyst that is so quirky - also the resin is very temperature sensitive during the cure - no matter how much hardener the intructions say to add for use at lower temperatures than 72F, I've still had problems - as such I will never use it except in the late spring, summer, or early fall and I'm in coastal SC and I only use it when I'm building up or customizing fiberglass/kevlar stocks - I do NOT recommend it for bedding.
     
  10. Clark

    Clark Well-Known Member

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    To keep it at a steady warm temp, I store epoxy in the house and mix it in the house and then walk to the shop.

    I have even started storing paint and glue in the house so they don't get cold.