Bedding?

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by BenY 2013, Sep 7, 2011.

  1. BenY 2013

    BenY 2013 Well-Known Member

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    Ok so I may have asked this before but I don't remember...Is there any downside to bedding a rifle with JB Weld??? Also on my Stevens 200 how do you bed the rear action screw area since it isn't all flat like the front action screw area? Sorry I ask way too many questions...Thanks
     
  2. rscott5028

    rscott5028 Well-Known Member

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    I have always used Marine Tex. So, I'm not able to address the JBWeld part of your question.

    I'm also not familiar with your action. But, when dealing with non-flat areas, I usually do some variation of the following...

    (1) wallow out the area underneath with the Dremel

    (2) apply tape and lots of release agent to protect finished surfaces and to avoid gluing the action to the stock

    (3) build dam(s) as needed to force pooling in the area that needs bedding and plug extraneous orifices using modelling clay

    (4) use alcohol to remove dirt, grease, release agent from bedding areas that need to adhere

    (5) fill in the area gradually using Marine Tex and tamping with toothpicks and splintered popsicle sticks to remove air pockets

    (6) sufficiently overfill the area and sink the action into it

    (7) remove overflow with popsicle sticks, heavy duty paper towels, alcohol

    (8) allow to set and then cleanup and inspect

    Good luck,
    Richard
     

  3. BenY 2013

    BenY 2013 Well-Known Member

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    Ok thanks for the advice!
     
  4. Hammack

    Hammack Member

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    I once did a rifle in JBweld once because I was in a hurry to finish it and it was the only thing in the shop I had that I could do it with. It actually turned out pretty well. Just be careful, and don't make a mess because it is hard as a rock when it sets if you get it on anything not protected.
     
  5. Gene

    Gene Well-Known Member

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    Do it right, use Devcon 1011. I leave the rear tang on Savage and Stevens float.
     
  6. BenY 2013

    BenY 2013 Well-Known Member

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    I'm still not sure what I am going to use, I like the idea of JB weld because its cheap and avalible readily....but not sure if it'll hold up over the years!
     
  7. Dr. Vette

    Dr. Vette Well-Known Member

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    Buy Devcon at the link below, and the shipping is free. Hard to beat this price, and then you'll never sit around wondering if you used a good material.

    Devcon Plastic Steel Putty (A)

    I bought 2 boxes not long ago just so I wouldn't have to worry.
     
  8. lsm62

    lsm62 Well-Known Member

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    +1

    i was going to use JB Weld out of ease but after some research decided to go with devcon and this was the cheapest place i could get it. bedding job turned out great.
     
  9. Hired Gun

    Hired Gun Well-Known Member

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    The reason most rifle builders use Marine Tex over Devcon is the Marine Tex Grey is a lot harder supporting 13,000 psi in compressive strength. Devcon will only support 8620 psi. This is one of the most important qualities for a bedding compond. In most other qualities like chemical resistance the Devcon is equal. Devcon requires 7 days to cure at 75 degrees where Marine Tex cures in 24 hours at 72 degrees. For the professional gunsmith the cure time can be a real issue when working with deadlines.

    In the past I have had troubles with brittleness or shrinkage but since I started mixing it by weight those issues are history. I attibute the problems I was having to inconsistant mixing ratios trying to eyeball 5-1. The correct ratio by weight is 6.3-1.
     
  10. BenY 2013

    BenY 2013 Well-Known Member

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    Ok so I think I am going to use Marine-Tex, but I would also like to possibly to a "grip texture" job on the stock as well! So the new question is how much will I need? Is the 2oz going to be enough or will I need more for the bedding and texture job? Thanks a million!
     
  11. Rstraw

    Rstraw Active Member

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    What is a good release agent for marine-tex ?