Stock finish repair_gunsmithing

Hind sight is 20-20 and I think you did a pretty good job. The cups look centered and they're not installed at an angle, a fostner bit is what I would have used too but I would have put some blue painters tape on the stock before I drilled it to help hold the finished down, (but it still might have chipped out). If it is lacquer the first thing I'd try is using a drop of lacquer thinner placed around the fitting to flow between the old finish and the stock. Repairs are made like this to lacquered guitars all the time, the lacquer is brittle but can be softened and even after years it will melt and lay back down. But since you're now missing some of the finish I'd personally use superglue to fill it back in, it will flow underneath the old finish and hold it down keeping anymore of the finish from lifting up and you can build up the edges and fill in where the missing finish flaked off and as others have suggested use a small file or glue fine sandpaper to a popsicle stick to knock it back down and level it out, but with any type of repair most of the time you will still be able to still see it. Below I attached a link to a couple of things I use when I'm dealing with repairs like this. As a side note you can take the end of the plastic pipette's and heat them with a match then stretch them out and recut the ends, this makes the hole even smaller and more precise when you're applying the superglue or lacquer thinner. Good luck.


 
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Thank you for all the comforting comments and suggestions how to fix the problem. Some of those were more extensive such as the one suggesting to clear the lacquer off of the gun. Although I agree that would be a definitive solution. I'm not sure it would worth the effort, and more importantly, if I have the skills to do that. I might just try to use some lacquer thinner, hoping it will melt the raised up patches and then cover it with another layer around the hardware.
 
Thank you for all the comforting comments and suggestions how to fix the problem. Some of those were more extensive such as the one suggesting to clear the lacquer off of the gun. Although I agree that would be a definitive solution. I'm not sure it would worth the effort, and more importantly, if I have the skills to do that. I might just try to use some lacquer thinner, hoping it will melt the raised up patches and then cover it with another layer around the hardware.
You will have to let us know how that works out. I have never heard of using thinner in that way and am intrigued to hear if it will actually work that way and repair the missing lacquer
 
Thank you all for the help. Perhaps I should have made a more determined effect, but I eventually decided I will try to be happy with good enough. Previously, I tried to make 'good' 'better' and ended up with some seriously botched work, so again I decided I will go with "good enough". Thus I did not dare to put a file to the stock fearing I would make it worse. I tried to use acetone to soften the old varnish, but it was ridiculously thick and hardly softened. (Note here, I do not know what varnish Sako used to use their wood stocks but it is about 100 um thick at the minimum. Apparently they shifted to just oil rub the stocks lately, and I think it would have been a much easier repair). Anyways, as I was trying the reattach, lay back down the softened, chipped varnish it flaked away. Which I was OK with. After I tried to scrape away the loose varnish, I applied several coats of polycrylic topcoat to protect the stock. Again, I do not think the results are perfect but they are fully functional and perhaps it will help me to shed some of my OCD nature.
Regardless thank you for all your advice!
Ferenc
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Several layers of thin superglue until it matches the depth of the finish. If you go to thick and have to sand you will never match the finish of the rest of the stock. It will have a different sheen.
 
I have a fairly expensive mandolin that decided to develop cracks throughout the lacquer finish from temperature changes and years of the finish drying out, I could probably fix the finish but it sounds great so I really don't pay to much attention to the finish anymore. Once you have the swivels and sling in place you probably won't pay much attention to a little finish chipping around the edges, so take it out and shoot it, hope you have fun with it. Take care.
 
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I have a fairly expensive mandolin that decided to develop cracks throughout the lacquer finish from temperature changes and years of the finish drying out, I could probably fix the finish but it sounds great so I really don't pay to much attention to the finish anymore. Once you have the swivels and sling in place you probably won't pay much attention to a little finish chipping around the edges, so take it out and shoot it, hope you have fun with it. Take care.
Thank you very much for the kind lines and encouragement. I am trying to shed my OCD nature and be happy with how the gun looks. It is 100% functional. It is just not as good looking as I hoped it was going to be. But, I think it is time to cut my losses and, as you said, get out, shot it and have some fun. Regardless I really appreciate all your help and perhaps next time I will do slightly better. (It is just nice to be a part of this forum where help flows freely and items change hand in the classifieds -often purely based on trust- in the majority of cases without any glitches. )
 
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