!!! 300 WSM Lapua brass !!!

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by Guest, Apr 14, 2004.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Ha , got your attention diden't I.

    I just got finished preping 500pieces of Winchester brass and was thinking the whole time "The 300WSM being such a popular case why doesen't Lapua make them ? I'm sure that they would sell as many if not more than the 30-06 that they offer"
    After resizing , triming to length , deburing the flash holes and uniforming the primer pockets , turning the necks so their all uniform I'm ready to start weighing them out. After all this work I'm sure that these damn things have to be worth at least $5 each and with my luck they won't shoot for beans.
    I sure wish that Lapua would make some 300WSM brass

    Well enough b!tch!ng from me.
     
  2. Guest

    Guest Guest

  3. Dave King

    Dave King Well-Known Member

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    I just got a shipment of Norma 300 WSM brass from Sinclair, 100 pieces and a few hundred Sierra 175 SMK's. Now all I need is a set of Wilson dies and I'm ready.
     
  4. chris matthews

    chris matthews Well-Known Member

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    Hey Dave? Don't you need a rifle to go with all that reloading stuff? [​IMG]
    PS Sure does shoot good!!! [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  5. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I know that Norma makes the brass but all the Norma brass I've used seemed soft and diden't handle pressure well at all , I'm gonna be trying to push a 190gr bullet out of a 24" barrel at 3000fps , I'm guessing that this is gonna be on the warm side so I figured that the Norma stuff woulden't last to long.
    Luckly I've got my chamber setup to where my FL die is just barely bumping the shoulders back and they are all gonna be FL resized .

    I have access to a very accurate digital scale but it only reads in grams out to the 4th decimal place , I'd like to use it to weigh out my cases but I'm not sure what the variance should be , anybody out their have any idea ?
     
  6. johnny k.

    johnny k. Well-Known Member

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    JD,
    Relatively new here, but noticed that you're using digiatal gram scale and was asking about variances. Do you mean variances in case weight tolerances (as in whats kept and whats thrown)? Or converting grams to grains?
    My profession was scale technician up until Nov 03 when I had a motorcycle wreck, but I worked on them for quiet a while until then. Not sure if I'll be able to return to work in the same capacity as before. I used a Sartorious gram scale that read out to the .0001 (10/1000ths) of a gram but got extremely tired of it and traded it. A fellow tech had a Denver digital scale that allowed conversion to other units (lb, oz, gn, kg, gm, etc.) and I traded him. Now I can weigh all my cases, bullets and powder out to .001 (1/1000ths) of a grain. I get so caught up in weighing powder sometime that I'll actually cut the extruded granules with my pocket knife to get it "exactly" on the mark. Talk about anal retentive! It's a labor of love though. Johnny K.
     
  7. Guest

    Guest Guest

    johnny k ,
    Thats what I ment ,I wanted to use the digital scale to sort my brass. I'm not sure what the conversion is for grains to grams , I think its like 15 grains to 1 gram.
    If you had to use a gram scale how would you go about it ??
    Any help is apperciated.
     
  8. johnny k.

    johnny k. Well-Known Member

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    JD,
    To convert grams to grains; multiply gram reading by 15.43 to obtain grains.
    To convert grains to grams; GNs X 0.0648 = GMs.
    To keep myself from get too confused while using the gram scale that I had, once I settled on the powder charge that I was going to use (say 43.0 grains), I would do the math and right that gram number down and post it so I could see it (i.e., 43.0 gns X 0.0648 = 2.7864 grams). Helped me. Good luck and holler if ya need something. Johnny K.
     
  9. Richard338

    Richard338 Well-Known Member

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    JD,
    I use a gram scale to 4 decimals since I work in a lab. I weigh all my powder charges into vials at work, then just dump them in at home. If your scale is good to 4 decimals it will be enclosed to protect the readings from air current disturbances. With the door open the reading will wander say .0005 grams. This is OK since a piece of H1000 powder weighs about .0020 grams. I just put one vial on the scale and leave it zeroed. Then fill the vial, trickle up to the weight, dump it into other vials, and put the vial that is already zeroed back on the scale. I can do about 50 powder charges in 20 mins, accurate to one piece of powder. I resist chopping pieces since this increases the surface area, and the powder was designed to burn in the size they come in. Also chemical deterents are soaked into powder pieces to slow the burn at first when the surface area is largest and they gradually allow it to speed up as the surface area decreases during the burn. This allows the powder to burn progressively or at least not regressively. Cutting the pieces exposes the inner parts at the beginning. Of course I realize that you are only talking about cutting one piece. My friend did some tests where he observed higher pressures when he used a powder thrower that seemed to crush some of the pieces vs pouring them to the same weight.
     
  10. johnny k.

    johnny k. Well-Known Member

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    Richard,
    Yeah I thought about that but like you said, it's only one kernel of powder. I don't think it will matter with charges destined for medium capacity rounds that I load for.
    Accurately measuring your powder to 4 decimal places definately takes one factor out of the error equation. Then you have to get Lapua brass, custom bullets, match primers, trued action, custom barrel and bedding. It's like one reader on here has as a quote "reloading is a means to an end, it's just there is no end" or something like that. Good luck. Johnny K.
     
  11. Richard338

    Richard338 Well-Known Member

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    Johnny,
    I'll tell you one thing. Measuring powder to one piece accuracy vs thrown from a measure cut the groups almost in half at 200yds. Let alone longer range. Thats just the one variable. Plus I can weigh them out pretty quickly like I said.
     
  12. Gowge

    Gowge Active Member

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