Discussion in 'Technical Articles - Discussion' started by ADMIN, Jul 19, 2011.

The One Mile Prairie Dog

  1. ADMIN

    ADMIN Administrator

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    This is a thread for discussion of the article, The One Mile Prairie Dog, By Mike Brust. Here you can ask questions or make comments about the article.
     
  2. theflyonthewall

    theflyonthewall Well-Known Member

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    I enjoyed it. I thought it was well written and the author was totally unbiased as to the outcome. It was a good read. Thank you.
     

  3. sll

    sll Well-Known Member

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    Agree on good article and unbiased printing of results. Mindblowing that a crosswind can push a bullet impact 30 feet at that distance.
     
  4. gruising

    gruising Member

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    Good job Mike! Did my first long range hunting for dogs in South Dakota too. My longest shot was just over 700 yards but I was happy as could be. I know you had a blast and the story was great. Thanks for taking the time to write for all of us. Gary Ruisinger
     
  5. jerrschmitt

    jerrschmitt Well-Known Member

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    A great read. I'm still trying for my 1000 yard prairie dog and have gone through much of the same preparations as you with the GPS and Google earth. One tip I might offer is the use of the Wild optical range finder. Quite easy to range at one mile and they don't break the bank.
     
  6. Oklahoman

    Oklahoman Member

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    Wow, I really enjoyed the article. I hope to get everything together to make a hunt like that. How does someone find the locations to go on such a hunt:rolleyes:
     
  7. Greyfox

    Greyfox Well-Known Member

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    I thoroughly enjoyed the article and learned a lot, particularly about using geographic information to select a good shooting location. Having thought a lot about trying to achieve the same goal I was surprised that while I can certainly understand time and financial limitations cited, that more emphasis wasn't placed on accuracy information. I know that wind, pressure, etc. need to be accurately calculated, shooting precision also has to be critical at a mile. A quarter minute of angle variation at a mile (4.4"), is about the width of a prarie dog. I am curious what the actual group data of rig was.