Techniques, and help with them

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by Limbic, Sep 29, 2008.

  1. Limbic

    Limbic Well-Known Member

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    I've got a couple of questions. My rig is a 7mm Sendero with some modifications (forend material removed, trigger to 2lbs, receiver bedded) and a NF 3.5-15x 56. Man it feels sexy. The groups however are less than impressive. My gunsmith easily gets MOA and less with 160gr Accubonds.

    When I'm at the range all I use for front rest is a Caldwell shooting rest. The simple three legged model. I usually have it placed half way between the swivel and the trigger. My left hand is either curled around to my right shoulder or on the beannie. When the gun goes off do I have enough support with this set up to negate any muzzle flip? Hell does muzzle flip have an effect on accuracy?

    Second question is what should I see when the gun goes off? Usually the recoil makes me lift my head a inch or two. I've seen guys shooting prone who don't even blink when they send a round down range. Of course I blink.:)

    thanks for the tips.
    The stickies really do help fyi
     
  2. straightshooter

    straightshooter Well-Known Member

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    I'm by no means a great shot, but I do love shooting, so take this into consideration. It sounds to me like your rifle set up is better than average and shooting to what would be expected. You said your gunsmith gets sub moa. I suffered for a few years with what I am expecting is your problem as well, the dreaded flinch. The good news is you can over come this more than admitted ailment.

    I will tell you how I over came my flinch and leave the shooting technique to the more skilled and experienced shooters on this site. First step was dry fire trigger practice. This helps develop the proper trigger pull (straight back, controlled squeeze), at the same time not having the recoil, or report of the rifle. I still jump at just the bang of a rifle going off at the range. It is important to squeeze the trigger so slow you won't know when the release will come. This will keep you from anticipating the moment of fire. Hopefully by the time you flinch, the bullet is already out of the barrel. Now do not be in a hurry to get through this stage you have to reprogram your brain and that will take a while. I am not saying don't actually go shooting but put in some dry fire every day.

    Second step is to practice follow through. After the shot, how do you react. The best way that I can explain this stage is FREEZE after the shot. Don't lift your head, don't move the rifle back to target, don't move your body, do nothing, even if your eye is no longer looking through the scope, don't move. For now just take the shot and count to 3 till you actually move. This will help from actually moving before or during the shot. You will be more relaxed with the shot.

    Now beg, borrow, or buy a 22. cal and get out there and practice practice practice. A 22 allows you to shoot a lot for cheap, and nothing helps more than trigger time. Some of the top shooters still hit the 22 more than their competition rig. You can really challenge yourself at the range with a 22. Hope this helps a little, but in the end you have to find what works for you, so don't be afraid to experiment to see what works. By the way do you reload yourself? This is another great way of getting more accuracy from your shooting.
     

  3. Limbic

    Limbic Well-Known Member

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    I think the flnch is part of it. I do dryfire but like most everything else- not enough. I'm going to take the 22 to the range tomorrow.

    The follow through is something I have trouble with. It changes from shot to shot and some if this was from having the scope mounted too far back. I'll definately try the count to three trick.

    .22/followthrough/slower trigger pull - that is what is on the menu for tomorrow.

    Thanks for the thoughtful input.
     
  4. adam

    adam Well-Known Member

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    If you dont have a cheek piece, get one. With my nxs, form improved greatly with one. much more consistant. Mostly because I am not strainingthe rest of my body to keep my head in the same place. A good rear bag helps a lot too. If you are on the bench looking down range. the rifle shoud sit very still except for your breathing.
     
  5. straightshooter

    straightshooter Well-Known Member

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    One more quick thought. Move your rifle into you, not you into the rifle. This gives you a natural hold. Line your body to the target, get into your shooting position, head in as natural a position as possible, then bring the rifle into your shoulder without moving. Support the rifle as solid as possible with what ever you are shooting with.
     
  6. yobuck

    yobuck Well-Known Member

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    all of the advice youve received is good. you didnt say wether you load or not. certainly that would help to find the combination best for that gun. also i would try a different rest. a pile of sandbags would be better, or 1 bag on some wood blocks. better yet invest in a good front rest. we use harris bipods often, and they work well. but for real accuracy, i think a rest is better.
     
  7. Limbic

    Limbic Well-Known Member

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    Do not reload yet. I do have 13-25 Harris bipod (grass gets real tall down here in Mississippi) but haven't gotten down in the dirt with it so to speak. I thought that the bench rest accuracy would be better.
     
  8. Wlfdg

    Wlfdg Well-Known Member

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    I re-read the "Marksmanship Basics" discussions all the time. There is a wealth of knowledge there! They help me a ton.
    Like Limbic suggested, lots of dry firing practice and I try to shoot my .22LR everyday I can. Some days I only get in about 50 rds. others I'll shoot for a couple hours. Every shot I go through a mantra. It's super relaxing.
    Lately I've been grouse hunting a lot. I feel that helps a bunch to, natural point of aim and all.
     
  9. yobuck

    yobuck Well-Known Member

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    senderos are usually very good right out of the box. some tweeking is usually necessary but not much. loading is the best way to obtain max. performance from any rifle. had i been advising you, i would have suggested a more reasonable scope if necessary, to allow for the aquisition of loading gear. certainly you have an excellant scope, but maybe more than you need at this point. im not advising you to sell it, but i think you put the cart in front of the horse. christmas is coming, ask santa for a loading outfit. dont be affraid to check out ebay for used equiptment. but dont just buy any equiptment. this is a good place to start asking questions. ill drop 1 name, REDDING.
     
  10. Limbic

    Limbic Well-Known Member

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    Definately put the cart in front of the horse but what can I say... I'm a sucker for good glass.:)

    I scrubbed the barrel clean and got much better groups today. Also let the gun cool more. Now that the temps are out of the 90's it is a bit easier.

    Shot a couple of .9 inch groups with Federal/Barnes TSX so there is progress being made.

    So far I can tell the gun likes a completely cooled barrel (duh right) and for me to put my left hand on the forend to help with recoil.

    Thank for the good advice everyone.