glass bedding

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by screech, Jan 28, 2006.

  1. screech

    screech Well-Known Member

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    Nov 26, 2005
    Hello, I got a question for those who know. When glass bedding a rifle should the barrel be bedded also and if so how far up it. I had a rifle bedded this summer by a local smith and he bedded around 5 inches up the barrel. Its an lss in a 300rum if that maters.
     
  2. James Jones

    James Jones Well-Known Member

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    bedding of the barrel is an issue that has to be tried and tested to see what the gun wants , some guns shoot best with the whole barrel bedded other shoot best with the barrel floated.
    Personaly I perfer to have a barrel free floated.
    When I bed a gun I pillar both front and back and glass the front of the action generaly say like on a Rem 700 I'll bed from the mag well to about one inch in front of the recoil lug. In wood of Synthetic stocks I like to have my bedd at least 1/4" thick so I remove a good bit of material from under the front of the action , I don't believe that skim bedding does any good unless you doing it on an aluminum bedding block. Also , I only use Brownells Steel Bed kits , I feel that I get a better service and results with it than other epoxies and JB weld type things , yea it more expensive but I feel its worth it (never tied Marine-Tex)
     

  3. Ronin

    Ronin Well-Known Member

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    I would suggest that it really depends how heavy the profile is in the first place. Normal sporter weight barrels do not really require any extra support beyond the front of the action face, but if you have a varmint profile and longer than normal (+ 26") tube I have found in my own rifles that a bedding "pad" placed from the action face forwards by about two and a half inches does assist in supporting heavier tubes. The remainder of the barrel being free floating in the forend. I think that by doing this, less stress is imparted onto the action, which can only help accuracy.
     
  4. 1doug

    1doug Well-Known Member

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    Andy hit the nail. the throat is in most cases is @ 2 inches in front of the action. on heavy contured barrels i have been known to bed the whole straight section of barrel to help keep the action stresses down.


    d-a