Elevation difference with scope zero?

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Elk Addict, Oct 24, 2013.

  1. Elk Addict

    Elk Addict Well-Known Member

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    Have a newb question here....

    My rifle is zeroed at 200 yards, and I do most of my shooting around 6500'. I am going to be hunting next week on the other side of the state, at an elevation of 3700'.
    Now I have my range cards printed out for that elevation, but my question is; will I need to re-zero my rifle at 200 yards when I drop in elevation? Obviously there will be a change to my short range trajectory, but will it be enough to justify re-zeroing my scope?

    I guess I could shoot some rounds when I get there to verify, but am just curious what you all do.
     

  2. HARPERC

    HARPERC Well-Known Member

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    I always verify zero when traveling. Except for when I don't, then I always pay for it. :D
     

  3. Scot E

    Scot E Well-Known Member

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    Not sure how far you will be shooting or what your max range is but that will play a part in what you should do.

    I will always check zero to make sure I didn't get a shift in transit but adjusting zero is a different matter depending on your system. Do you use a ballistic calculator? If so many of them will show the change in zero from your site in conditions to your current shooting conditions. This is true assuming you understand how to run your ballistic program correctly! :D If that is built into your charts then you will know what the change in conditions will do to your sight in zero.

    Some guys just check zero, taking into account the change their program tells them they should have and call it good. The other option is to rezero where you are going to be shooting and changing your zero conditions. There won't be much change at all for your conditions so it will likely be a moot point for your situation but the above is some of the basics.

    If your using pre-printed charts with no atmospheric condition change showing from sight in to hunting conditions then I would re-zero at my hunting location, print the chart to match the conditions I think will most closely match what I am going to encounter while hunting and go that route.

    Again there will be a very small change to zero but if you have big changes in your atmospheric conditions, not just altitude, but pressure, temp, etc., then you will get enough change at distance to cause a miss. Sometimes a couple charts for different conditions is best.

    Hope this Helps

    Scot E.
     
  4. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    I always like the confidence that comes after a little shooting at the new hunting altitude. If time is permitted I will check zero and fire a couple at 700 yards or so to confirm drops.

    If your zero is correct, and the range cards are confirmed at the elevation and temps you will be hunting, you should be all set.

    Jeff
     
  5. MHO

    MHO Well-Known Member

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    All the above. Check your zero to make sure you have not bumped anything. If your calcs and cards are correct you will be fine. Good luck hunting.
     
  6. Scrubbit

    Scrubbit Well-Known Member

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  7. Elk Addict

    Elk Addict Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the replies. I have range cards for altitude change and different temperatures. I feel confident out to 800 yards (wind permitting). But I will recheck zero upon arrival.