bullet seating depth

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by blindarcher, Feb 19, 2013.

  1. blindarcher

    blindarcher Member

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    Feb 19, 2013
    How critical is bullet seating depth for handgun reloading? I have some Remington Golden Sabers and reloading manuals do not provide data for this bullet. There is data for other same grain bullets but OAL is not the same as factory loads with this bullet. I have read that seating bullets deeper in rifle cartridges decreases both pressure and velocity, while the opposite is true for most handgun cartridges. I would like to see discussion on the effects of bullet seating depth and crimp.
     
  2. tomestone

    tomestone Well-Known Member

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    What type, need to be more specific,cal,gun type,barrel lenght,ect:)
     

  3. Red hunter

    Red hunter Well-Known Member

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    Only pistol bullets I reload are for S&W .44 mag 629 6 1/2 inch barrel. I may have gotten lucky using Hornady 240 grain HP XTP. using H110 and seating to the middle of the crimp ring. They shoot a little under .5 at fifty yards. I dont crimp them and have not had a problem with them moving.
     
  4. tomestone

    tomestone Well-Known Member

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    I reload 9mm and 40 SW 231 Win.in each using a Lee progessive reloader,both are semi auto,handguns,The CX storm 9mm with 16 in. barrel will group 1 in. at 100yds with 4x scope. bullet lenght has to fit in the mag. I load with no crimp,but full lenght resize.
     
  5. Nimrodmar10

    Nimrodmar10 Well-Known Member

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    I think you've got that backwards. Seating a rifle bullet out to a longer length allows more room in the case for the powder and ignition, lowering pressure, unless more powder is added to fill that space.

    In pistols the shell length is limited by either magazine or cylinder length. Most pistol bullets have a cannelure grove that sets the seating depth and allows the bullet to be crimped to prevent recoil from causing the bullet to withdraw from the case and jamming the weapon.
     
  6. fishinintx

    fishinintx Member

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    Actually the longer a bullet is seated out in a rifle, the more pressure is created since the bullet is seated closer to the lands, when the round fires the pressure is directed down barrel, when as with a shorter seating, the chamber throat allows for pressure to expand a bit...its kinda like saying it has no where else to go in one and somewhere else to go in the other. One actually sees less pressure in a shorter seated bullet...no so in a pistol however. Theres a good article on here about pressures. Do a search and it has some chart explanations.
    I didnt see how old this post was sorry.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2014