Bedding compound

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by ofdscooby, Aug 27, 2013.

  1. ofdscooby

    ofdscooby Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    214
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2011
    I was wondering the advantage of using a davcon over a JB weld from my local hardware store. I bought some JB weld that had a PSI rating of 5000 for a bolt handle conversion on a stock but when it was time to bed the rifle I ordered some davcon and when it showe up it had a PSI rating in the mid 2000's. Does this PSI rating refer to the hardness and if so would the JB weld I found be better to use for the bedding job.
     
  2. ILtoMT50

    ILtoMT50 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    100
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2013
    i was wondering the same thing, about other epoxys though. i ended up using an actual bedding material too, cant recall what it was offhand. i was just worried if i had used something else it might not have released the same etc. better to be safe than sorry. i did see on the interweb something about one of the guys using a compound that he got from some hvac place(probably just some industrial epoxy they had i imagine) but like i said i just went the safe route, looks better than i thought it woudl turn out lol alot of knowledgeable guys on here im sure one will chime in sooner or later
     

  3. Southernfryedyankee

    Southernfryedyankee Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    415
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2009
    I have used Devcon steel epoxy 24 hour cure on every bedding job and all my beds came out GREAT.
     
  4. Hired Gun

    Hired Gun Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,537
    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2003
    Marine Tex has one of the highest compressive strengths of all the bedding compounds (13,000) and is fairly economical. The only Devcon that is stronger is the titanium stuff (15,200) and it's pretty expensive to only exceed Marine Tex by such a small margin. Marine Tex used with aluminum pillars is a rock solid combination. It's all I use.
     
  5. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,307
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2004

    Hardness and ductility go together and there is a happy medium. I always recommend using a
    compound that is specifically made for bedding.

    The fact that something will work does not mean it,s best . It can be to hard and brittle, to soft and it will not last. Some compounds are very difficult to work with and with difficulty comes poor bedding jobs.

    Buy something that is made for bedding firearms and easy to work and you wont be sorry. Leave the
    multipurpose compounds for the experienced.

    Just a recommendation.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  6. ofdscooby

    ofdscooby Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    214
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2011
    Well I ordered a two part Davcon from Midway it's a small amount just a couple ounces on the package there if pictures of household projects and crap. So Midway is selling the regular old household stuff as bedding compound or is any of the two parts capable and if so what's the minimum and maximum PSI you should use. I one I ordered said around 2500 PSI and some mentioned one that was 15000 but can be brittle.
     
  7. Edd

    Edd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,391
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2011
    Both McMillan and Manners use Marine Tex.
     
  8. Bart B

    Bart B Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,483
    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2005
    Both Devcon Plastic Steel and MarineTex have the least shrinkage when cured as well as resistance to bore cleaners when compared to so many other epoxies. They've got good strength, too.
     
  9. Clay Target Guy

    Clay Target Guy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    196
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    I have used Devcon for years but switched to Marine-Tex due to the ever increasing cost of Devcon.
    I like them both but to be honest, if cost were not a factor I would still pick Marine-Tex. It just seems to work a little easier for me.

    On a side note, Devcon and I think Marine-Tex have a shelf life and you should pay attention to that.