Bedding Compound Removal ????

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by elkaholic, Jun 18, 2013.

  1. elkaholic

    elkaholic Well-Known Member

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    Well, after years of bedding rifles, I got in a little too much of a hurry and managed to stick some bedding compound to my action. What is the best way to remove this without scratching my action or worse?.....Rich
     
  2. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    It happens to everyone. Try a wood tung depressor, I use them to mix the bedding compound
    and if I get some on the action I use the tung depressor to scrape it off. the wood is tough but
    wont scratch the action.

    To help prevent this I normally coat the entire action with wax before bedding. I use the wax as
    a release agent.

    J E CUSTOM
     

  3. elkaholic

    elkaholic Well-Known Member

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    Hi Jerry......Nope, it's worse than that! The compound is set up.....Rich
     
  4. bigngreen

    bigngreen Well-Known Member

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    I use a wood dowel and tap it with a hammer to chip it of. A soft wire wheel in a dremel works very well also and leaves the finish alone.
     
  5. elkaholic

    elkaholic Well-Known Member

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    Maybe I'll try the dremel:D......Rich
     
  6. phorwath

    phorwath Well-Known Member

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    The last bolt action rifle I glass bedded was a Mauser brand rifle back in 1976. It had a nice wooden stock in caliber .222 Remington. Mostly used it to hunt red fox back in Michigan. The fore end of the stock never did release from the barrel. The butt and pistol grip separated from the barreled action thru the magazine box cutout, as I recall. Last I ever used that rifle. Took it to a gunsmith to get it restocked and his gun shop burnt down while my rifle was there. I concluded that this particular rifle and I were meant to part ways... :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2013
  7. elkaholic

    elkaholic Well-Known Member

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    That sounds like a "YOOPER" rifle Paul!:D
     
  8. Bullet bumper

    Bullet bumper Well-Known Member

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    Shave of as much of the compound as possible without touching the metal work . Then experiment with different solvents to see what softens it .
    Then using that solvent soak and scrape gently with a hard wood scraper .
    If you used anything with epoxy in it it may be hard going and you could try Dynasolve CU-6 to soften epoxy .
    Heat can also soften epoxy .
     
  9. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    Try Freezing it overnight. This is the best way to remove a stock that has been bedded to a barrel.

    The coefficient of expansion of the bedding is different that the metal parts and sometimes it releases its self in the freezer.

    After freezing use the tong depressor to scrape it off.

    Hope this helps.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  10. elkaholic

    elkaholic Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all the info guys! Now I'll remember why I was so careful previously:D.......Rich
     
  11. idahoelkhunter

    idahoelkhunter Member

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    Maybe somebody can confirm this. I used to live on a boat and did ALOT of fiberglass work. A heat gun was my best friend when working with stubborn epoxies and resins. Again, seek confirmation first. I would contact the manufacturer.
     
  12. Gary Kaney

    Gary Kaney Well-Known Member

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    + 1 on what J E Custom said.
     
  13. elkaholic

    elkaholic Well-Known Member

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    I think I caused a little confusion on what the problem was? The stock was removed, but it had chunks of bedding stuck on the action. I used a soft wire wheel on a dremel and being careful to not apply much pressure, it came off without removing the bluing on the action.......Rich
     
  14. Buttermilk

    Buttermilk Well-Known Member

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    Glad you got it off.

    Certain epoxies can be softened quite nicely when in contact with Methanol alcohol and sometimes gasoline.

    Learned this the hard way when running methanol in two stroke Banshees with epoxied ports.