Want to get into reloading and have a few stupid questions

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by pwrdbycotn, Mar 12, 2011.

  1. pwrdbycotn

    pwrdbycotn Well-Known Member

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    I currently shoot a .223 for coyotes, .270 for close range whitetail, and a 300 ultra mag Sendero for long range whitetail and other larger game. I'm wanting to get into reloading for these guns and possibly a 6.5 Grendel that I'm thinking about having built. I'd like to start off simple but with the best equipment. What I'm currently thinking is a Hornady lock n load classic single stage kit, hornady m-2 case tumbler, hornady lock n load case prep center 110 volt and hornady lock n load auto charge powder scale and dispenser. I can get these items from midway for $1000. I know I'll need dies and shellholders but what else will I need? Is the Hornady about the best you can get? I realize it will take a while before the cost of the equipment pays itself off, but the peace of mind of loading my own and being able to experiment with loads for my ultra mag is worth a lot to me. What do you guys suggest?

    -Billy
     
  2. 300 ultra

    300 ultra Well-Known Member

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    I have the RCBS KIT and have been happy with it. You will always want to add random items to your reloading so I dont think there is one that is better than other in my opinion. If Hornady looks good to you than I would go with that.
     

  3. roninflag

    roninflag Well-Known Member

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    hyandloading gives YOU control that is why 99.99 per cent do it. i use a primer pocket uniformer from sinclair to clean my pockets . i use 99% rcbs stuff except for a lyman electronic powder measure. does not mean horn is not just as good. roninflag
     
  4. desertbull

    desertbull Well-Known Member

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    If you get the Hornady kit right now, they are giving you 500 bullets for free. That's good deal, considering that a box of 50 runs anywhere from $25-50.
     
  5. rscott5028

    rscott5028 Well-Known Member

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    I bought a Lyman Kit and it was great until I really started getting picky about accuracy. Then, I had to start buying everything all over again.

    It only costs a little extra to go first class...

    Forster Bonanza Co-ax press w/ regular shell holder adapter
    Redding S-Type bushing dies or Lee Collet dies
    RCBS 1500 powder dispenser
    Sinclair flash hole deburrer, primer pocket uniformer, vld chamfer, and neck turning tools
    funnel
    loading blocks
    Neco Concentricity Gauge
    Dial calipers
    Hornady COAL gauge, Bullet length ogive adapters and Headspace adapter for your calipers
     
  6. BigSkyGP

    BigSkyGP Well-Known Member

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    Kits work to get you started and give you a base reference for what you'd like to have. It gets addictive. I had the same thoughts you do about saving money, not a chance, you do shoot more though, for what you would've spent on factory ammo. The biggest benefit, is taloring loads to your rifles, factory can almost never do that.

    I'd keep my eye in the classifieds, where some widow is selling of her husbands loading bench, if you can wait.
     
  7. FOWARDASST

    FOWARDASST New Member

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    START BY BUYING A LOADING BOOK , A GOOD ONE UP TO DATE. MAKE SURE THAT THE FRONT OF THE BOOK IS SHOWING YOU THE BASIC'S OF GETTING STARTED, ALSO FIND SOMEONE LOCAL AT THE GUN SHOP OR RANGE THAT DOES IT ALREADY, THEN START TO READ AND READ AND READ, AND FOLLOW THE RULS YES THEIR ARE RULES,AND IF YOU BREAK THEM YOU WILL BE IN A WORD OF HURT.lightbulb
     
  8. FOWARDASST

    FOWARDASST New Member

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  9. MTBULLET

    MTBULLET Well-Known Member

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    look at dillon. best loaders that come set up in the cal. you choose. just need a good scale and you can start loading.
     
  10. pwrdbycotn

    pwrdbycotn Well-Known Member

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    Thank you all for your replies. I ordered the latest version of the ABC's of Reloading, Hornady 8th edition reloading manual, and the Lyman 49th reloading handbook. I plan on doing a lot of reading before making purchases but hope to be reloading ammo for hunting this fall and winter.
     
  11. BigJakeJ1s

    BigJakeJ1s Well-Known Member

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    First, the OP wants to get a single stage setup.

    Second, the only Dillon reloader that comes set up in the cal you choose is the SDB progressive, and it only loads handgun cartridges, while the OP listed only rifle cartridges to be reloaded.

    For low- to moderate volume rifle cartridge reloading, a single stage press is preferable, especially if you are new to reloading.

    Kits are offered by many reloading manufacturers, and all of them have serviceable equipment. Some are significantly lower priced, and often become replaced with better equipment as budget allows and experience guides. Others have better equipment to start with, but are much higher in price. NO KITS offer best-in-class tools for every reloading function, because no manufacturer has best in class tools for every function. The best hand primers are not available from the same company that has the best press. And "best" is a highly subjective term anyway, since different users have different preferences anyway.

    If it were me, I would start out with a very good book (ABCs of reloading is highly regarded), and a reloading manual or two. Lyman and Hornady are very good, but so are many others. As you gain experience, especially for a brand of bullets, etc. purchasing the reloading manual published by that manufacturer is a good idea. Reloading data from most powder manufacturers is available on their websites for free.

    Then I would start with a Lee kit. Then I would use it, and find out what I liked and disliked about it. With that knowledge, I would set out to replace those things I did not like.

    If you want to assemble a kit on your own, I have found the following pieces to work best for me:

    Forster Co-Ax press (with standard automatic shell holder jaws)
    RCBS Universal Hand Primer (square tray)
    L.E. Wilson case trimmer
    Hornady Cam-Lock collet-type pullet puller

    You'll notice I mentioned four different tools, each from a different manufacturer...

    Many choices for other pieces of equipment work well, but are not significantly better than one or more alternatives, so I won't go into those.

    Andy
     
  12. The Duke007

    The Duke007 Well-Known Member

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    If your looking for a kit get the rcbs. But if your looking for individual components start with the forster co-ax press. I also got the rcbs prep center (saves time).you will be happy with it. Rcbs trim mate. Rcbs chargemaster. I use rcbs and lee dies. Both work really well. Lee priming tool. Definately get good calipers its worth it especially if your going to be anal on measurements ( like me ) . You can also get a lot of knowledge from youtube. It helped me out tremendously. Your going to get scared but you will get the hang of it. Once you do theres no limit. Good luck