Titanium Firing Pin

Discussion in 'Equipment Discussions' started by Mountain Man, May 8, 2003.

  1. Mountain Man

    Mountain Man Well-Known Member

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    Feb 18, 2003
    i've been reading that a titanium firing pin will reduce lock time. not that i'm to a point where this will make much difference for me, but every little bit helps. average price seems to be about 30 bucks. is it worth it?


    i thought i'd bring up to see what anyone says, and maybe it'll help someone else out as well.

    -brian
     
  2. *WyoWhisper*

    *WyoWhisper* Guest

    I put the titanium pin and the tubbs spring in my .308 about 3 weeks ago.. my groups actually did shrink a bit on average. consisitient .3's down to the mid to high .2's seems to work... the spring and the pin are about $69 from Sinclair's
     

  3. Holmes

    Holmes Well-Known Member

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    Feb 26, 2002
    Hey Ric,

    I've been considering making this upgrade, as well.

    Are you happy enough with the new pin/spring that you would do it again?

    Thanks.
     
  4. rjf3

    rjf3 Well-Known Member

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    Mar 12, 2002
    I have one in my .308 very satisfied.

    Russ
     
  5. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Titainium pins work, but you guys should know that if you run hot loads, or pierce a primer your pin will likely be a casualty, a little extra caution will help realize the benefits without the downside. [​IMG]
     
  6. rjf3

    rjf3 Well-Known Member

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    Mar 12, 2002
    I use it in a .308 only shooting 2600 fps with a 167 grain bullet. Not as fast as she'll go, but best accuracy.

    Russ
     
  7. *WyoWhisper*

    *WyoWhisper* Guest

    I am without question happy I mad the upgrade. I have just started to break in my Ultra Mag. and I am sure I will do the same for it as well. In my opinion you need the sring and the pin to reall make a difference. Sinclairs sells them both. reduction of lock time by 38% or more ...I think...

    S1 I hear what your saying.. my smith also drills to "vent" holes in my bolt for just such and occasion. [​IMG]
     
  8. speedbump

    speedbump Well-Known Member

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    Mar 28, 2002
    I'm with S1 on this one - if you pierce a primer with a titanium pin, get out your check book. I have one in my AR, but I don't go too close to max with it either...
     
  9. Brent

    Brent Well-Known Member

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    Jun 12, 2001
    They come short so you can set protrusion length?

    Ric, where are the holes drilled in the bolt? Any pics?

    Why are they more prone to breaking with a pierced primer?
     
  10. Guest

    Guest Guest

    The hot gas oxidizes titanium and tinitride coating much quicker than the steel used in firing pins.
     
  11. *WyoWhisper*

    *WyoWhisper* Guest

    Brent,

    The holes are drilled on the bolt so when you close it they are pointing out ( to the right side ) They are about 1/8" dia. maybe a little more. I had one bad primer a year ago on my .308 and they definitly did their job. Then I just took the bolt apart and cleaned it and then reassembled.

    Sorry no pics Brent digital camer took a $hit on me....
     
  12. Daniel Hall

    Daniel Hall Well-Known Member

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    Feb 12, 2003
    Tubbs speed lock firing pin kits (firing pin and spring)are actually steel tipped, alloy body firing pins. Most manufacturers did away with the titanium tips. I'm not sure why they did this, maybe for the reasons mentioned above. I have them on all my guns and haven't had any problems for over 5 years.
     
  13. Nighthawk

    Nighthawk Well-Known Member

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    Mar 2, 2002
    How would the hot gasses oxidize Titanium faster than steel. Titanium is used for the engins for the F-22 Raptor. The gasses from that are hot, whats the difference? [​IMG]