Setting Scope Back to Zero

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by xAsylum, Jun 24, 2011.

  1. xAsylum

    xAsylum Member

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    I am new to long range shooting, and I was curious about setting your scope back to your 100 yard zero after you have used your turrets to adjust it to a farther yardage, let's say 600 yards for the sake of the thread.

    I am using a Millet TRS-1 4-16x

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  2. youngbuck

    youngbuck Well-Known Member

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    For me, I would dial it up 10.2MOA or 41 clicks. After the shot I would turn it back down 41 clicks to exactly where it was before any elevation adjustment was made.
     

  3. xAsylum

    xAsylum Member

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    For some reason I thought there was a different/easier way to reset it back to zero.
     
  4. youngbuck

    youngbuck Well-Known Member

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    There are scope with "zero stops". They basically do the same thing in different ways. They will only let adjust your elevation so low(your zero). Some will let you pass your zero by no more than a full revolution and then you have to adjust it to "0". Some scopes you can tell how many revolutions you have "spun up". You can then watch until you have "spun down" to your zero. Some scope have no zero stops or markings for number of revolutions. Some scope you can "pencil" in marks for your zero. I am not familiar with the Millet scope. Maybe some one else has one and can help.
     
  5. xAsylum

    xAsylum Member

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    "The tactical turetts are awsome they reset to zero every time" This is what confuses me. Is there some way to reset it back to your zero after you adjusted it out to a different range? New with using turrets on scopes so I have no idea.
     
  6. youngbuck

    youngbuck Well-Known Member

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    I would assume that quote is some one who is describing how well and consistant the scope tracks. I understand it as they dialed up for a shot and dialed back down. Once they were dialed down they rechecked zero and it was still on. I did read the Millet owners manual about the turret locks. It sound like a ring below the turret than can be tightened against the turret to prevent it from moving unintentionaly. As far as I know there isn't a "reset button" or something similar that will quickly bring your scope back to zero on any scope.
     
  7. xAsylum

    xAsylum Member

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    oh okay. so basically, lets say I move it up 56 clicks. I would just move it back 56 clicks in the opposite direction to move it back to zero, right?
     
  8. cross

    cross Well-Known Member

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    If you're actually counting clicks on a scope that doesnt' have some sort of turret which keeps track of minutes and revolutions, good luck. I'm not saying that it can't be done but I couldn't keep it straight so I've always purchased scopes that had at least a resetable target turret (Nikon Monarchs, Burris Tacticals, etc. have these so their not really high end equipment only).

    Otherwise, what you should be seeing is the minutes you've adjusted on the scope and below that, on the stem of the turret, the number of revolutions. You'll have to pay attention to where the number of revolutions coincides with the zero you set for yourself when you reset your turret after zeroing your rifle. You can mark it or make a lable or photo to put on the side of you rifle to indiate the correct number of revolutions which coincides with the zero on your rifle. It's very doable and was the way it was done until the zero stops came out.

    Cross
     
  9. SBruce

    SBruce Well-Known Member

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    Basically, yes; that is all you have to do. As cross mentioned, it is much easier to count minutes if you have a scope that will show minutes. Counting clicks is a PITA, and leaves alot of room for error. Additionally, if the scope has a micrometer type base on the turret, then you don't have to count back at all........you just record where zero is (example: zero is 4 marks showing below/above the rotating portion) and turn it back to that reference when you are done.

    Some scopes have a "zero stop" which basically just doesn't let you turn it backwards past that initial zero spot. With these, we just dial for the shot and then turn it backwards until it stops moving. This stop is adjustable of course.

    Here's a picture of a Leupold Mark 4, it doesn't have "zero stop", but it has the micrometer type of reference. It was set at zero at 100 yds for that load/rifle. In this case, we would note somewhere that zero is 5 marks showing.
     

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  10. Gene

    Gene Well-Known Member

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    I shoot in 500 meter groundhog matches with a pair of older NF 12-42 scopes not equipped with zero stops, and I constantly forget to turn the micrometer turret back to zero when I finish. Next match, my first shot is nowhere to be found. Usually I then realize I forgot to turn it back.

    Some day I will find a way to install zero stops on them. The point is, the first thing you need to do is remember to turn it back.
     
  11. LouBoyd

    LouBoyd Well-Known Member

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    There is. Reticles offered by Horus Vision (in several models) need no knob twisting or click counting at all. The numbers and major ticks are milliradians. The small ticks are 0.2 milliradians.
    It may look busy, but it 's much faster to use than target knobs and less chance of getting "lost" than counting turns and clicks. Use it with a range card or ballistic calculator just like you would with target knobs.

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    Last edited: Jun 27, 2011