Scopes to use at Night

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by backyardshooter, Oct 25, 2005.

  1. backyardshooter

    backyardshooter Member

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    This question does not really apply to long range optics, but what scopes are going to work the best for night hunting varmint's?
    I use A 3-9X50mm VXII Leupold, on a model 600 REM, 243. Sweet and short!
    But would a Leupold European 3-9X50mm with the 30mm tube larger exit pupil work much better. Price of this scope would be about $419. I do not know the % light transmission on either scope. For the $420 what would work best in your mind. The 30mm does say midrange magnification. Not a problem at night, but it might raise a question in the day any help there please?
    Last a Bushnell 10X40 Elite 3200 mildot price $170. Any one yous-ed or seen this scope. I like 10 fixed power with mildot but, when I looked threw the scope at the gun shop, the 3200 elite was not what I thought it would be terms of clarity? I did buy a BSA sweet 17 2-7x32 for $65. great scope for that price.
     
  2. Pete Lincoln

    Pete Lincoln Well-Known Member

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    You need something with European lenses. I'd recomend a Schmidt & Bender.
    but a hunting scope from Zeiss, Swarovski, Kahles, Doctor Optic etc, will do you ok.
    Pete
     

  3. LB

    LB Well-Known Member

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    I do a lot of night hunting. By what you listed, I'm not sure if you are ready for the sticker shock?

    A 3X12X56 Kahles is about the cheapest, when you say "best" and it isn't cheap, but it is certainly better than any Leupold.

    More advice. Do not get any sort of cluttered mildot reticle, or a dot. A simple duplex is the best for night hunting.

    Now, for $420 dollars, I think a 3.5X10X40MM Leupold is good value. I used one for several years; I don't know what they cost now, maybe around $400? For sure, do not get a fixed 10X scope, not bright enough.

    Good hunting. LB
     
  4. Pete Lincoln

    Pete Lincoln Well-Known Member

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    Actualy a mildot is pretty good for nights. it leads your eye to the centre of the ret. Ive been using a 3-12x50 S&B PMII with a Mildot for about 10 years now for night hunting. is there anything better?
    Pete
     
  5. Dave King

    Dave King Well-Known Member

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    I also have found that a Mil-Dot reticle is good for night shooting. The wide bars seem to make correct alignment simple and fast.

    The other reticles I've used seemed too light/thin and I spent a good deal of time fighting to see the reticle against the target.

    Also for night shooting I try to setup such that I benefit from the conditions... If I'm over a light background field I try to position so that I see the shadow (as lighted by the moon) side of the target (dark silhouette) but if it's a dark background field I setup so I see the lighted side of the target (light silhouette), in essence I setup for the most contrast.
     
  6. Charles A

    Charles A Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    but what scopes are going to work the best for night hunting varmint's?


    [/ QUOTE ]

    UNS. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif Though it might be a wee bit more expensive then $420. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/shocked.gif
     
  7. Pete Lincoln

    Pete Lincoln Well-Known Member

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    But i would steer clear of them damn Horus christmas tree reticles at night. ( infact at any time of the day)
    Pete
     
  8. 270WSM

    270WSM Active Member

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    Nikon makes a good Monarch Gold 2.5-10X56. This Gold series uses the same optics as the Tactical Series I believe. I picked up a 1.5-6X42 Monarch Gold for my muzzleloader yesterday. Seems just as clear as my Tactical. German #4 reticle is pretty cool too.
     
  9. LB

    LB Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    The other reticles I've used seemed too light/thin and I spent a good deal of time fighting to see the reticle against the target.


    [/ QUOTE ]
    (if we are still allowed to disagree?)

    That's exactly why I would not use anything more that a duplex, or a heavy duplex and I will spare you the resume.

    But. There is no doubt that a simple duplex is the right choice against a brushy background, considering shadows, obstructions and fast acquisition. Not much to debate, really?
     
  10. Ian M

    Ian M Well-Known Member

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    Really surprised that you guys are not considering illuminated reticles. They work.
    Best poor light scope I have used is an old Redfield Ultimate Illuminator - 3x9x56. This thing is amazing, blows away scopes costing three times as much. Whoever supplied their glass made good stuff.
     
  11. Dave King

    Dave King Well-Known Member

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    LB

    The reticles I've had trouble with were the duplex models offered by Leupold. Once I switched to the Mil-Dot and it's very wide bar beyond the 5 mil measure it became very easy to find the central aim point. I believe the ease of the wide bar Mil-Dot is that it is huge by comparison to a duplex. I don't have the subtension values of Leupold fine duplex versus Premier Reticle MilDot but it's a significant difference.
     
  12. Dave King

    Dave King Well-Known Member

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    The illuminated reticles I've seen allow for the illumination to be seen from the objective end too, nice for the shooter but emitters if someone is looking.
     
  13. Pete Lincoln

    Pete Lincoln Well-Known Member

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    Ian, now i'm convinced you have summot up wi your eyes mate, either you live so far north it hardly ever gets dark and you get dazzled by looking through superior EU glass or you should see the ey doc.... i think i'll have to come over and show you these PMII's of mine... hint hint,.,.
    Dave,Ian, ive illuminated ret on my 3-12 and the 4-16. Ive used it a fair bit, but only realy needed it maybe 4 times.
    if you wack the illum right up you dazzle your self and yes it can bee seen through the other end, i find i only ever need the first setting, it gives a faint faint glow to the aiming mark, it bieng seen from the other end might be a consideration if you are stalking towel trophies rather than antler, but last time i looked deer didn't shoot back..
    right, i gotta run, i'm into my 14th hour of a 12 hour shift and ive a date with a wild boar..
    I took the 1st ever Roe Buck shot with a 4-16x42PMII last week and i'm about to try to take the 1st ever wild boar with it. see how that 42mm lens works with the illuminated reticle.. full report tommorow night.. squeeeeel.. oink oink
    Pete
     
  14. LB

    LB Well-Known Member

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    It occurs to me that maybe we are not on the same page?

    I hunt predators at night, with a spotlight. Never hunted boar or any other big game at night using available moonlight.

    With a variable intensity spotlight, you do not need an illuminated reticle, you do not want one. They tend to blind you from seeing and identifing the target. Even at the lowest setting, it's a distraction.

    What we do is adjust the light so the eyes barely reflect. When the animal gets to a shootable position we hit them with the full wattage for identification and precise shot placement. There is no time to switch a reticle on and off. It has been tried and discarded. I know over a thousand contest hunters that do it the exact same way as I have explained, this is not some hair brained idea that I singlehandedly developed, we all use the same type of equipment.

    I really don't know what type of night hunting comes to mind where a mildot reticle is a benefit, maybe there is an application, but not for hunting predators with artificial light. For that application, in all modesty, I'm as knowledgeable as you will ever hope to find, with thousand of kills. I happen to know a few things about night hunting coyotes. If you are not doing it my way, you have a lot to learn.

    Good hunting. LB