Rifle for my Caribou hunt

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by jeff 300, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. jeff 300

    jeff 300 Well-Known Member

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    I'm booked to go to Alaska this SEPT to hunt caribou and maybe a wolf if i get lucky. has any one been there hunting bou??? I'll be hunting out of Kotzebue. I want to build a rifle for this hunt something lite. But I'm like my edge so much that it hard to not take it. If i build a new rifle it would be a 300 rum r a 7 MM rum r just another 338 edge but not so heavy. I just don't know what to expect hunting there. Is carrying a 15# rifle going to be to much for this hunt that's what my edge weighs now so any info would be great.

    Thanks
     
  2. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    .300 Rum, 7mm STW, 300wm, .264wm in that order of preference would be where I'd go.

    You can get any of them in a sub 9lbs package and still have great accuracy and adequate power for a Caribou out to 800 with the last two and at least 1,100/1,200 with the other two.

    One thing I know from my brief time in AK and talking to lots of guys who have lived/hunted there over the years is that wind can play a huge factor on the Tundra so the higher BC bullets available for the .300's gives them an edge.
     

  3. Michael Eichele

    Michael Eichele Well-Known Member

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    I concider myself to be in pretty good shape and 15# for a gun I may be carrying for miles and miles is a bit much for me. I dont know about you. If youhad it on a back pack and still was able to carry your daily gear, food etc....that may be an option.

    Caribou are not as tough or spirited as some critters like elk. You dont need a barrel burner or a sledge hammer for caribou. I agree with WW, the wide open tundra can be very windy and shots can be long. this of course depends on where you are going. Some areas have more cover than others. Still, a high BC bullet is in order. If I had to dedicate a rifle for caribou it would be a 338 RUM or Edge. Higher BC bullets available than the 300's or 7 mm's and will handle big bears in an emergency. I have an Edge that weighs in at 10.5 pounds with an NXS scope with one peice base, 3 rings, ACI and ACD. Kicks fairly hard but carries all day with ease.

    Otherwise my choice would be a good old 300 Win Mag. Maybe a 7mm Rem Mag.
     
  4. cbb

    cbb Member

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    Hope you have a great time!
    These are just things I would consider. Hope they may be helpful to you.

    Topography- if you are in the flat tundra- ranging can be difficult. It may limit your ability to range really far. Flat, bumpy, squishy tundra is hard to walk on for some. How far from camp are you willing to pack the gun and your trophy? If you have some small rises and ridges, they can be more rocky (like gravel) and you can go forever. How far are you willing to pack? Not as common, but mountains or steeper stuff by some rivers could be encountered. Your pilot may be able to give you some info as to how far most hunt from camp. Also how far other camps are to you. That can limit your desire to travel as well.

    The weather is just unpredictable- sunny, calm, snow, fog, wind, rain. You could get one of those conditions or all of them.

    I would try to get an idea of how for I might travel and decide if the weight of the gun would make a difference to me. I would then bring my best long range gun in that weight. My max range is then more likely to limited by conditions rather than what I was packing.

    I almost forgot. The weight you are allowed to fly out (assuming you are flying) could also be a factor.
     
  5. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    +1
    All good choices.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  6. Derek M.

    Derek M. Well-Known Member

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    I really never understood the need for big long heavy barrels for long range if you are going on a hunt where you have to carry the dang thing.

    I'm 220 pounds, have worked out since I was 14 years old, used to run 3-7 miles per day 6 days a week for over 20 years. I'm tired after carrying a 9 pound rifle for 2 hours. Screw 15 pounds. You're a stronger man than me and more power to you if that's what floats your boat.

    I know what I can do and for me to enjoy a hunt, especially something like Alaska, I'm taking one of my rifles that weighs 6-8 pounds loaded. I'd say my 6.5x284 weighs around 7.5 pounds and that's about all I want to tote around in terms of weight.

    My 300 Ultra has a 28" Shilen #4, an HS Precision stock and a leupold 4.5x14.40. I think it weighs in around 10 pounds loaded. I've taken it to Utah, Wyoming, Kansas, Texas, and Colorado. It is my second heaviest rifle. My 270 AM is the heaviest.

    After 9 hours with the 300 over my shoulder I'm really hating that I have it instead of my 7mag or something lighter.

    Guess I'm a wuss.
     
  7. Long Time Long Ranger

    Long Time Long Ranger Well-Known Member

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    Get something light and easy handling that will stop a grizz. They can be brave in that area. Anything will take a caribou but that is not your concern. No need for a rifle with over 800 yards capability when your rangefinder may not range him past 600 on the tundra. Sometimes you get the right background to range one but often you do not. Typically you can stalk caribou to a few hundred yards. I would focus more on light and a grizz killer than long range however if it will do both then great.
     
  8. jeff 300

    jeff 300 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the info. I'll be hunting way up past kotzebue. I just bought a J107 dragonfly back pack to carry my rifle. i have an action laying around that i need to do something with. i will probably build 338edge that is lighter, shorter barrel than my edge i have now. But i have never had a 7MM rum before r a 7mm of any kind. So who knows.
     
  9. Long Time Long Ranger

    Long Time Long Ranger Well-Known Member

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    I personally do not like to carry anything under a big 30 caliber with me loaded with premium hunting bullets that retain their weight and energy just because of the bear problem. I carried my 264 STW about 15 years ago and loved it as a caribou rifle hoping I wouldn't bump a grizz. I just didn't feel comfortable at night the whole time I was in there. I like a big gun to stop a bear coming in the tent.

    A light 338 winchester or a 338 RUM is a good choice.
     
  10. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    I'll warn you. If you build a nice STW and shoot it for a year or two you'll be hooked for life.

    A truly amazing and versatile caliber that is a lot of fun to shoot and won't break the bank.
     
  11. liltank

    liltank Well-Known Member

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    I'm going to suggest the 338 Norma Mag. It was developed to be optimize 300gn bullets in 23.5-25" barrels. You can send a 300gn bullet at 2750fps from a 24" tube w/o over pressuring the rifle. It will give you a ton of versatility and enough power to take down the biggest grizz. You may want to consider it.

    Tank