Operator error or what?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by TheRoaminRaider, Jun 9, 2012.

  1. TheRoaminRaider

    TheRoaminRaider Well-Known Member

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    Ok guys, I'm still pretty new at reloading so cut me some slack if this is a rookie mistake. I got a new rifle (Remmy 700 in 308win) and sat down to start taking measurements to start working up loads for it. I used the Hornady OAL gauge and comparator and took about a dozen readings. Every one of them was at least .027 over the maximum COAL listed in the hornady manual. I'll try to get a pic up if it will help, but basically the bullet just sticking WAY out there. Is this something I'm doing wrong or is it maybe the chamber was cut too deep or something?
     
  2. venatic

    venatic Well-Known Member

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    Not unusual at all. I would start at .015 off the lands and work a little closer if you want to tinker. Now depending on your bullet you may not be able to get all the way to touching the lands but you should be able to get close. The rule of thumb for smaller calibers is to seat at least the diameter of the bullet into the case..... for a 30 caliber I would think to the base of the neck would be sufficient.
     

  3. woods

    woods Well-Known Member

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    I'm surprised you are able to seat that close to the lands with a new Remington. Most remington factory rifles nowadays come with a long throat.

    The COAL listed in the manuals is not a dimension you have to adhere to and you can seat your bullets so you have a COAL that will work in your rifle.
     
  4. TheRoaminRaider

    TheRoaminRaider Well-Known Member

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    Ok I feel better now. But what about the cannelure being so far off? Should I just crimp them anyway or leave it alone? Its way above the lip of the case
     
  5. 243Lapua

    243Lapua Well-Known Member

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    Most remington 700 in 308 that I have encountered are cut deep so the bullet will stick to far. Br cateful because the case will not hold the bullet good enough. seat the bullet at saami specs to start of load. and do minor adjustment to get the best group.

    my 2 cents
     
  6. TheRoaminRaider

    TheRoaminRaider Well-Known Member

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    Picture for reference. It's hard to see but yall know what you're looking at
     

    Attached Files:

  7. 243Lapua

    243Lapua Well-Known Member

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    BTW I never crimp.
     
  8. Gunpoor

    Gunpoor Well-Known Member

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    I have never understood why bullet manufacturers add a cannelure to some bullets. I never crimp case mouths for a turn bolt rifle, and if I did I wouldn't worry about cannelure alignment.

    BTW, my Browning A-bolt II in 308 has 0.160" jump to the lands when 165 grain Speer BTSP bullets are seated to max magazine length, but this doesn't seem to detract from the accuracy of it.
     
  9. Daveinjax

    Daveinjax Well-Known Member

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    If your 700 remington has a hinged floor plate you can get an extended magazine box from Wyatt and have your action fitted by a smith. It will allow for @ 2.95" COL witch should let you reach the lands. I did this to both my SA 700 remingtons:D
     
  10. brentc

    brentc Well-Known Member

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    Some manufacturers have a functional cannelure by using it as a means to lock the copper jacket to the lead core. ie: Hornady Interlock. Or, other manufacturers have rings to decrease bearing surface. ie: Barnes TSX, Hornady GMX. Others are as you describe with no real reason other than for a crimp groove.

    There is nothing wrong with ignoring the cannelure when seating your bullets. I agree it looks funny to have the cannelure that far above the case mouth, but that's about the only negative thing about it.
     
  11. 7 loader

    7 loader Well-Known Member

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    Looks good. how does it shoot?
     
  12. flashhole

    flashhole Well-Known Member

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    Do not crimp the bullet on the smooth wall. It may cause a bulge that will prevent the round from chambering in your gun.
     
  13. Joe King

    Joe King Well-Known Member

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    Looks like my 270 loads :), I never crimp my bolt gun loads either, probably never will unless I get something like a 458.........
     
  14. TheRoaminRaider

    TheRoaminRaider Well-Known Member

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    Well thanks for the input guys, I still have a long way to go. I was listening to the books tell me to always crimp hunting loads, so thats how I have been doing it. I guess I was lucky that the first rifle I loaded for had measurements that fell right on the cannelures of the bullets I've used so far. This is primarily going to be a long-trek gun, and I wasn't sure just how much "abuse" the rounds could take. I'm gonna try loading some up of different lengths and see what works and what doesn't.

    7loader- Still don't know yet, waiting on the base to arrive. Can't wait to find out though! I was trying to get some loaded up for it's christening.