Neck sizing? what tools?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by isu600rr, Jun 12, 2010.

  1. isu600rr

    isu600rr Active Member

    Messages:
    43
    Joined:
    May 19, 2009
    So i have been getting some help on here and i would like to get the most out of my gun, so my next step i beleive is to do some neck sizing so i can have the same wall thick ness, for consistant tension, also i beleive that this will help with bullet run out also?
    So any tips and what are the tools that you use or recomend for me to start this.
     
  2. woods

    woods Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    965
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2006
    Hey isu, you can neck size which is using a die to form the neck only so it will hold the bullet but this does not have anything to do with "same wall thickness". To get the same neck thickness you have to outside neck turn which is removing brass from the outside of the neck with a turner
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Two different things.

    If you are asking about outside neck turning equipment and turning then you will need

    A turner (the one in the pic is a Forster Hot 100) and a good way to measure neck thickness (a caliper just won't cut it). You need a ball micrometer and I highly recommend a hands free stand
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2010

  3. TOM H

    TOM H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,107
    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2001
    here a good article
    Outside Case Neck Turning for Factory Rifles | The Reloading Press
     
  4. Chas1

    Chas1 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,547
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    woods, if you don't mind me asking, who's ball micrometer is that and did it come with the stand?
     
  5. Mikecr

    Mikecr Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,248
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2003
    The mic Woods is using is nice. But needs a proper stop for measuring unturned brass. Easy mod..
    Example of what I mean:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    You can use a neck mic to measure your neck brass for same thickness, and low thickness variance. With a good lot of brass, you should have plenty enough that match. Throw the rest away or turn them.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2010
  6. TOM H

    TOM H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,107
    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2001
    I use the same one
    SINCLAIR INTERNATIONAL : Sinclair/Starret Case Neck Micrometer -
     
  7. Chas1

    Chas1 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,547
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Tom H, to say I'm partial to Sinclair would be an understatement but I don't own one and wondering how do you like it?
     
  8. TOM H

    TOM H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,107
    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2001
    I sure like mine be lost without it. I've started with a ball mike Like Woods has it's accurate I just find the Sincalir alittle more handy. Tom
     
  9. Chas1

    Chas1 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,547
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Thanks for responding Tom, good to know. I just like the Sinclair quality so far.
     
  10. woods

    woods Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    965
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2006
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2010
  11. Chas1

    Chas1 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,547
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Woods, looks like you may have a winner there. Both mic and stand have 5 star rating in the review section and nicely priced. Thanks for sharing.
     
  12. boomtube

    boomtube Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,595
    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2007
    "my next step i beleive is to do some neck sizing"

    That can be good but for different reasons than you mention.

    About all neck sizing does is avoid body sizing with an FL or body die. That can/may increase case life a tad but it really won't make a lot of difference unless you also anneal the necks from time to time.

    For factory rifles, I strongly prefer Lee's Collet Neck Sizers to any conventional or bushing sizer neck dies. The Lee die works the necks the absolute minimum and leaves them straight and with the same size interior diameter too. The collet die has a moving part and that seems to trouble some users, it's not a simple "sholve it in, pull it out" thing so there is a learning curve. (Those not willing to learn to use it would do better to get a conventional neck die.)

    I lightly skim turn my necks using the same Forster (HOT-100) neck turner show in Wood's photo. It's not expensive, as turners go, but does excellant work if used correctly. I then use Lee neck dies for very little case runout; no seater can load straight ammo in crooked, uneven necks. Since I'm only cleaning up maybe 60-80% of the neck circumferance when reloading for factory rifles I really don't need one of those tubing micrometers at all. (I have one, just don't need it except when turning for tight neck target chambers! :) )
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2010
  13. Chas1

    Chas1 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,547
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    boomtube, you spoke of factory rifles what about customs...any thoughts.