Molly coated bulletts

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Traper55, Apr 30, 2006.

  1. Traper55

    Traper55 Member

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    Is it not a good idea to shoot molly coated and copper coated bulletts out of the same gun. Our local Snipper said that you can not mix them, thanks, Traper. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/cool.gif
     

  2. Bart B

    Bart B Well-Known Member

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    What harm comes from mixing them?
     

  3. zingdingo

    zingdingo Well-Known Member

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    I don't think that it would actually hurt anything. However, if you got the bore seasoned to moly and switched to the uncoated load, it may shoot differently than it would in a bore used to uncoated bullets (and vice versa). You should be able to switch back and forth without this concern by cleaning properly in between.

    I'm not an expert in this area but I believe that explanation has some validity.

    Carl
     
  4. Traper55

    Traper55 Member

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    I was told that ef you switch from molly coat bullet to copper coat that you loose accuracy, later, Traper. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/confused.gif
     
  5. elkfirst

    elkfirst Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, but that doesn't cut it without a valid explanation. How does a material having the hardness of chrome molly or stainless get "seasoned" by a coated bullet passing through it?. Metallurgical characteristics may perhaps be altered by a hardening, annealing or tempering, none of which are possible by simple firing. So coating remains the only alternative that I can think of, and certainly nothing that cannot be returned to virgin material with a good cleaning. Maybe you should ask the local Snipper for a more thorough explanation, I'd sure like to hear it. I've heard the same statements from the "so called" experts at the local gun stores.
     
  6. 1doug

    1doug Well-Known Member

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    the "seasoned" he is refering to is when the moly fills in the microscopic pores of the metal.


    d-a
     
  7. Varmint Hunter

    Varmint Hunter Well-Known Member

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    I agree with ZINGODINGO. If you switch back and forth you will never have a unifirm bore coating and velocity & accuracy will be unpredictable.

    However, If you try moly coated bullets and then want to switch to naked bullets just give the bore a good cleaning with JB compound or a similar product. Any residual moly will eventually be removed by the subsequent firing of naked bullets.I have never experienced a problem doing this.

    I also have never had a problem with my rifles that are feed moly bullets exclusively.
    /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     
  8. MT4XFore

    MT4XFore Well-Known Member

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  9. River Rat

    River Rat Member

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    <font color="red"> </font> Dan, moly coated bullets sure are controversial. I tried them, and decided to follow the advice from two good sources; Dan Lilja, and the fine folks at Sinclair International. I agree with them.....there are just too many varibles. I know David Tubb, the Bergers, and several other top shooters swear by them, but feel like my own experience might offer an idea of how the "Too many varibles" could pan out.

    I prepped a bore of a .308 with a moly paste, then dry patched, and shot a box of Blackhills ammo, loaded with 168 grain moly coated Sierra Matchkings. All twenty rounds were showing signs of too much pressure, with bright marks on the base of the cases, and difficulty raising the bolt handle.

    Since Blackhills ammo and Remington rifles both enjoy an enviable reputation, I figured the moly was the problem. I throughly cleaned the bore with Bore Tech's Moly Magic, and followed with JB Bore Paste. Subsequent rounds show no signs of over pressure. Was it bad ammo, or the moly? I don't know for sure, but I did stop shooting moly coated bullets, and removed another varible.

    The bottom line is....... how much moly is too much?
    Call me simple minded (I do believe in the KISS principle), but I'll stay with conventional, noncoated bullets, until a bomb proof method of using/cleaning with moly coated bullets is widely known, and throughly documented. Here is a link with Dan Lilja's opinion of moly coated bullets.

    http://www.riflebarrels.com/faq_lilja_rifle_barrels.htm#moly%20coated%20bullets