LOBO Watch link, should be a sticky

Discussion in 'Wolf Hunting' started by Coyboy, Dec 31, 2011.

  1. Coyboy

    Coyboy Well-Known Member

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    Guys this is the best site I have found for wolf info with current events.
    The news releases are excellent.

    This is a notice to dog hunters about a canine poison that is being used against the wolf, If you hunt with hounds please be aware of the effects if your dogs get into it.

    This product is sold locally in WI and amazingly guys actually use it as a hand cleaner after gutting out a deer, in the woods, every year.


    Xylitol Artificial Sweetener Is Toxic To All Canines! .........December 11, 2010. The following information is being sent out to warn hunters who go afield with dogs.

    find it article here; Lobo Watch - Wolf News
     
  2. Coyboy

    Coyboy Well-Known Member

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    Can I give my dog xylitol?

    No- we do not recommend that xylitol products be fed to pets. Our products are intended for human consumption only. Since the release of a report on xylitol and dogs published in the October 1, 2006 issue of the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), Xlear has regularly been asked about the company’s position on the sweetener as it relates to man’s best friend. We’ve written an FAQ to address these questions specifically. Xlear does not make products for dogs, nor do we recommend dog owners give their dogs xylitol or any other food designated for human consumption.

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    What do I do if I think my pet has eaten some of my xylitol products?

    If you are concerned for the health of your pet, we recommend you contact your veterinarian. Be prepared to provide your veterinarian with a description of the products your pet consumed and any symptoms you pet has experienced.

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  3. Coyboy

    Coyboy Well-Known Member

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    Cases of xylitol poisoning in dogs rise
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    The Animal Poison Control Center of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has managed a substantially increased number of cases involving xylitol poisoning in dogs. Found in sugar-free chewing gum, candy, and baked goods, xylitol is a sweetener that can cause serious and sometimes life-threatening problems for pets.

    The center managed more than 170 cases of xylitol poisoning in 2005, up from approximately 70 in 2004, said Dana Farbman, a certified veterinary technician and spokesperson for the center. As of August, the center had managed nearly 114 cases in 2006.

    An increase in availability of xylitol-containing products may be one reason for the rise in cases, Farbman said.

    While it was previously thought that only large concentrations of xylitol could cause problems in dogs, lesser amounts of the sweetener may also be harmful, the center reported.

    "Our concern used to be mainly with products that contain xylitol as one of the first ingredients," said Dr. Eric Dunayer, who specializes in toxicology at the center. "However, we have begun to see problems developing from ingestions of products with lesser amounts of this sweetener." Dr. Dunayer said that with smaller concentrations of xylitol, the onset of clinical signs could be delayed as much as 12 hours after ingestion.

    According to Dr. Dunayer, dogs ingesting substantial amounts of items sweetened with xylitol could develop a sudden drop in blood sugar, resulting in depression, loss of coordination, and seizures. "These signs can develop quite rapidly, at times less than 30 minutes after ingestion of the product. Therefore, it is crucial that pet owners seek veterinary treatment immediately," Dr. Dunayer said. He also said that there appears to be a strong link between xylitol ingestions and the development of liver failure in dogs.

    To learn more about xylitol ingestion in dogs, turn to page 1113 for "Acute hepatic failure and coagulopathy associated with xylitol ingestion in eight dogs."

    For more information on xylitol
    and other products poisonous to pets,
    visit the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center
    by logging on to
    www.aspca
     
  4. Coyboy

    Coyboy Well-Known Member

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  5. shorty

    shorty Well-Known Member

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    Almost lost my Wirehair to this crap! Just before Thanksgiving I'd bought some rawhide chews for her...cheap...should have been a clue right there. She got sick within half a day, lethargic and apparently in pain.

    The vet suspected xylitol but will not know for sure,since the label on the packaging didn't list this stuff and the product was eaten and nothing showed on the blood test.

    Yes, it could have been something else, but after hearing of the sudden rise in canine poisonings AGAIN from this stuff, I believe my vet.

    This happened a few years ago too, and was eventually linked to Chinese imports of dog treats and such. You can guess where the treats I bought for a dollar came from. Lesson learned.
     
  6. buckfynn

    buckfynn Well-Known Member

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    It is a pity the webmaster of lobo watch used such a poor color selection that makes it near to impossible for me to read their site. <sigh>
     
  7. Coyboy

    Coyboy Well-Known Member

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    Click on the WOLF BLOG,
    left side bar, that will give you many articles to read all on a white screen with black text.