loading manuals to bullet interchangable?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by clemens, Feb 10, 2013.

  1. clemens

    clemens Well-Known Member

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    I have a Barnes reloading book can't remember which volume at the moment, but can one use different bullet brands as long as the weight of bullet is the same? I am sure Bergers are a breed of there own. Can Speer bullets be used with Barnes or sierra loading manuals as a example? as long as bullet weights match load information.
     
  2. jfseaman

    jfseaman Well-Known Member

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    No.

    And it's more complicated.
     

  3. Viking

    Viking Active Member

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    I would not have a problem using data for a specific weight bullet. Look at Sierra, for example, and you will see that they will list a variety of different bullets types of the same weight for a specific caliber and powder charge. I would follow basic safety measures and start with a 10% reduced load and work my way up in pressure.

    Manufacturer specific data is always best, but you will not always get the specific combination that you want to load. This is particularly true with newer products. The same question could be asked about specific powders not being listed.
     
  4. Lefty7mmstw

    Lefty7mmstw Well-Known Member

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    I usually cross reference to weed out the B.S.. If I see a lot of variation between different makers in a certain cal and bullet weight I'm extra careful. Some of the bullet makes seem to be more "sticky" in the bore and will use less powder than others too.
    Like another poster said "And it's more complicated. " Run up your loads from a sane point and watch out.
     
  5. Damascus

    Damascus Well-Known Member

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    You can't use the same data for different bullet weights, even if they are the same weight and type.

    Many reasons for this, the biggest ones are:
    Bearing surface,
    Jacket thickness/core,
    Bullet material.

    Look at a .308" 165 gr. Nosler Ballistic Tip, a 165gr. Hornady SST, a Sierra 168 gr. Matchking HPBT, and 165 gr. Barnes TSX...

    All of them are the same weight, or close, but all will produce very different pressures.

    When you fire a bullet, the powder charge ignites and starts building tremendous pressure, very fast. As the bullet starts to move, it contacts the rifling and thus is met with a lot of resistance. Now, the tremendous pressure behind the bullet causes the rear of the bullet to expand, and "swage" itself to the shape of the bore/rifling grooves. The thinner the jacket is (like in BTHP Match style bullets, very thin jackets for good seal/good forming), the more seal it will create, causing chamber pressure to increase. The opposite happens with solid copper or gilding metal bullets like the Barnes TSX, Nosler E-Tip, and Hornady GMX.. The copper/gilding metal is harder than the standard lead/copper jacket combination, so it seals differently, as well as acts different "sliding" across the grooves, i.e. - friction.
    The shape, or ogive, also matters. A bullet with a longer bearing surface, the part of the bullet that is actually contacting the rifling, will increase pressure, since it takes more pressure to move it down the barrel.
    This is why Sierra has different load data for their Matchking rounds than for their hunting rounds, the Matchkings' thinner jacket causes pressure to increase. Same thing with Speer. For example, they have a list of data for their 150gr. Hot-Cor hunting bullets, but a completely different list for their 150 gr. Trophy Bonded Bear Claws, and the lists cannot interchange.

    If you cannot find data on your selected bullet, just find data for the closest, most similar bullet to the one you are using, and reduce the load considerably, and work up from there.

    Also, as you may know, if depends on the firearm. I own a couple of rifles in .30-06 - one of them I shoot 52.5 gr. of N140, for the best accuracy and speed, which is a rather hot load, and in the other 06', I get pressure issues at 49 gr! That's a big difference! If I would have decided to start loading rifle 2 using slightly reduced data from rifle 1, I'd get into trouble quick.

    Load data is just a guideline... Never take it as gospel, nor anyone else's data. YOU must find the right data for YOUR rifle.
     
  6. clemens

    clemens Well-Known Member

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    thanks guys this gives me good excuse to buy reloading manuals. Shucks! the wife will be so happy. NOT!:D
     
  7. winmag

    winmag Well-Known Member

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    Yes, & no.

    Yes you can use a Nosler, or Hornady, or Sierra etc load manual for like weight bullets, of like construction. But Not for monometal to lead core or vise-versa.

    Bearing surface of different brands of bullets vary. Usually not enough to be a nuisance, untill you get nearer the top end loads. As long as its Like construction. Lead core/lead core or {sometimes}mono/mono{not always} but NOT Lead/Mono
    As usual, always work up. Every rifle has its own personality. Some take warmer loads than others. Some show pressure signs early.


    *** one of the big NO NO's is trying to use lead core bullet load data for mono metal bullets & vice-versa***

    If one chooses to shoot Barnes bullets, use their load manual. But the Barnes manual is kinda unique. It doesn't translate to anything but Barnes bullets.
    If you've only got a Barnes manual, I'd suggest purchasing another for all other load data.

    Nosler has data in thier 7th edition for their mono metal bullets as well as their lead core bullets.
    Most other manuals have at least some load data for their mono metal bullets as well. But it is typically lower charge weights for mono metal bullets vs lead core.

    In other words if I want to shoot a 30 cal. 180gr Nosler Accubond, or Partition, or a 180gr Hornady SST, or BTSP, or 180 gr Sierra Deep Curl I could use any current load manual that had lead core load info for 30 cal. 180 gr bullets as a guide or reference.
    Ie; I can use Hornady manual for lead core Nosler bullets, & Sierra for lead core Hornady etc. as a guide.
    **but this load data is NOT the same for mono metal bullets** like Barnes, or any other monometal bullet reguardless of brand.

    Good luck with the new book(s).
    Let your wife know its for safety reasons, & she may be a little more leanient. Or not:D
     
  8. Clark

    Clark Well-Known Member

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    I started out with a load book when I was learning to hand load.
    Then for a while I did use published data as a starting point to developed my own loads.
    I no longer use them.
    Obviously there is no published data for the wildcats I build.

    Load books are not science nor engineering, they are recipe books. Unless you are advanced, you should stick with the recipe.
     
  9. Joe King

    Joe King Well-Known Member

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    this one

    it can be done but it's not advisable to do it off hand, I have one load that I interchange bullets of the same weight, which bullet depends on what I'm shooting at. BUT each and every load was was worked up individually and just happened to give the best accuracy at the same charge weight, same powder same primer. I should also point out that, that particular rifle has throat erosion bad enough that not one of the bullets used in it can touch the rifling and still be touching the case neck.
     
  10. clemens

    clemens Well-Known Member

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    what info does one use for the Berger's ? Is there a manual for there bullets or does one use a manual and work up like the other bullets?
     
  11. Viking

    Viking Active Member

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    Berger has a complete manual.

    Loading Manual | Berger Bullets