How to use coppermelt in my .308???

Discussion in 'Equipment Discussions' started by ElwoodB, Feb 22, 2007.

  1. ElwoodB

    ElwoodB Well-Known Member

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    Hi everyone,

    in the middle of the Coppermelt-Hype I actually managed to get hold of two bottles - anyone remember?
    http://longrangehunting.com/ubbthreads/s...=true#Post66650

    Anyway, after many cleaning sessions with various products I really need to give it a go with my trusted .308 Roedale. But I just dont remember exactly the specific way how to use it...

    No copper brushes?
    Under-caliber brushes?
    Special coated cleaning rod?
    Highly absorbing patches?
    Do I need a bore guide?
    How do you clean your chambers with that stuff?

    Sorry for the load of questions but I would really appreciate some input on this - it´s about time I tried this miracle cure myself! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif

    Cheers,

    elwood.
     
  2. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Use a steel core nylon brush undersized IE: .224 in a.243 bore.Wrap a patch around brush and use a few drops on same about 25 passes thru the bore will show black and blue traces on patch.Use a good bore guide!!repeat several times untill the patch comes out clean,no blue.I use a plastic pipet to apply so as not contaminate to good stuff in the bottle.If your gun has been shot a lot it might take a while to get it done right.
     

  3. .25AOD

    .25AOD Well-Known Member

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    I find it works well to clean with a powder solvent first, something like Butch's or Hoppe's #9. Then I actually like to run a couple of Copper Melt or Sweet's wet patches through and let it soak for 5-10 min. After a round or two of that if it's still showing some blue streaks I'll go to the John Barnes method.
    I take an oversized nylon brush, place a couple of patches over the top and use it to seal up my chamber. After the chamber is sealed I drip a bunch of Copper Melt or Sweets through the muzzle and down the barrel. I then let it stand in the corner for 10-15 min. I found this methods really removes some of the tough copper that's lodged in the sharp area between the lands and the groves. I'm pretty sold on this method.
    As a side note: I tend to only clean using this method if I'm planning on switching bullets (ie. Nosler to Barnes). Or, I use this method after about 200-250 rounds fired. My normal cleaning, about every 30 rounds, is done simply with wet patches of Butch's. The small amount of "seasoning" left after a quick cleaning with Butch's requires no "fouling" shots... 1st one cold & clean is right in the middle of the group. Usually after I strip a barrel clean it take 4-6 shots to get it rolling again.
     
  4. ElwoodB

    ElwoodB Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    Use a steel core nylon brush undersized IE: .224 in a.243 bore.Wrap a patch around brush and use a few drops on same about 25 passes thru the bore will show black and blue traces on patch.Use a good bore guide!!repeat several times untill the patch comes out clean,no blue.I use a plastic pipet to apply so as not contaminate to good stuff in the bottle.If your gun has been shot a lot it might take a while to get it done right.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Sorry, but at the moment I am not sure if a bore guide is the thing you use to protect the muzzle from damage or the thing you stuff into the receiver???

    Either way, can you recommend one?

    Cheers,

    elwood.
     
  5. MagMan

    MagMan Well-Known Member

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  6. goodgrouper

    goodgrouper Well-Known Member

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    No hype buddy. If you don't like it, send her my way. It is fought over like halloween candy in a 3rd world country around here! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif All we had to do was show a few guys how it works and it got bought up faster than the mint could print money.
     
  7. ElwoodB

    ElwoodB Well-Known Member

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    No worries mate, I have no intention of giving my Coppermelt away - took me ages to get some of that stuff over here! Actually I am thinking of import the stuff big time... /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif

    But in order to convince customers I really need to see how it works.

    So since you are probably the most experienced coppermelt user, can you give me some details on the cleaning equipment you use???

    Cheers,

    elwood.
     
  8. arthurj

    arthurj Well-Known Member

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    Old bear hit it right. just use an under sized brush with a patch wrapped around it. Drop some coppermelt on the patch and stroke it through the barrel several times. I use tipton nylon brushes that have a stainless core. That stuff is awesome. I have never seen anything as easy as coppermelt.
     
  9. goodgrouper

    goodgrouper Well-Known Member

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    Darn, I was hoping to get another bottle or two!

    Well, since you are keeping yours /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif, just follow what arthurj and old bear said and it will work great. I find that a steel cored 22 caliber nylon brush will work with most calibers if you find the right sized patch. I usually use the 1 3/4" patch for most calibers under 7mm. For bigger, I use a 6mm brush with 1 3/4" or 2 1/4" patches.

    Just make sure you use a steel cored nylon brush because this stuff will desolve the brass ones and give you a false reading.
     
  10. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Bore guides by Dewey are a good choice or the ones from Sinclair which are caliber and rifle specific.Stoney point guides are usable if you are careful. As for the muzzel end of the rifle I don't push the brush all the way out of the barrel, otherwise the patch can strip off and waste some of the coppermelt as you try to re-wrap the damn thing.
     
  11. ElwoodB

    ElwoodB Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    Darn, I was hoping to get another bottle or two!

    Well, since you are keeping yours /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif, just follow what arthurj and old bear said and it will work great. I find that a steel cored 22 caliber nylon brush will work with most calibers if you find the right sized patch. I usually use the 1 3/4" patch for most calibers under 7mm. For bigger, I use a 6mm brush with 1 3/4" or 2 1/4" patches.

    Just make sure you use a steel cored nylon brush because this stuff will desolve the brass ones and give you a false reading.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Hi goodgrouper,

    thanks for the advice, tried it and it works miracles!!!

    Had some trouble with the patches though - they just would not absorb Coppermelt unless you "rubbed it in"...

    Is that Coppermelt-specific or am I using the wrong patches? Can you recommend better ones?

    Cheers,

    elwoodb.
     
  12. winmagman

    winmagman Well-Known Member

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    Elwood

    You'll want to use only cotton patches, Coppermelt just seems to roll off any other type.

    Chris
     
  13. ElwoodB

    ElwoodB Well-Known Member

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  14. winmagman

    winmagman Well-Known Member

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    I'd go with the second one, the cotton flannel patches. The first has "cellulose material" added, I have no idea what that is, might work might not, but I know the cotton flannel works. Hate to see you have to order them twice.

    Chris