Help

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by MarioT, Apr 14, 2007.

  1. MarioT

    MarioT Well-Known Member

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    Dec 27, 2006
    I'm embarresed to post this, but I feel like I have too. Everybody at some point had to learn this. Lets say I somewhat know how to clean a rifle, basically the bore. What I usually do is follow the instructions on the back of the Remington Bore Cleaner bottle. I use remington bore cleaner, rem oil, gunmaster(?) cleaning set, and gunmaster patches. It doesnt seem to be cleaning right, I dont know this... its just I have that feeling.

    What I really want to know is how do I properly clean a rifle. What should I use? How should I do it, from step to step. I have a Stevens Model 200 30-06, and I use a .270 bore brush, it fits in nice obviously. Its pretty snug when I put a half patch (I cut the gunmaster patch in half because I think thats what it says). Should I put the patch on the brush and run it through, even when it is really snug (along with following the instructions).

    I'm seriously lost and confused and I need a big hand from someone or somepeople.

    Thanks to whoever helps me, and i'm very sorry if this was already posted.

    P.S. I use Remington/cheaper things because it is the only things I can currently get my hands on. I have already fired the rifle a good amount and I dont feel good about this situation (cleaning and so on).
     
  2. britz

    britz Well-Known Member

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    You need to have a good rod to clean with (one piece is better, but a multiple piece is ok if it is in good condion). Many barrels are damaged from bad cleaning rods. You shouldn't put a patch on the brush. A brush is ment to brush with and a "Jag" is ment to put a patch on. Get a jag for YOUR caliber and a brush for YOUR caliber. Use a good quality solvent and clean with it. Talk to a rep at your local sportsman store and they will guide you. Many solvents will turn the patch green or blue if there is still copper in the bore so you repeat the process until the patch comes out clean. Use a light amount of oil for storage.
    good hunting
     

  3. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    Lucky you should ask because you are just in time for my Earth Day Clearance Sale. This coming Saturday will be Earthday cleanup and I will be obtaining many new and wonderful guncleaning stands so I need to move the old inventory. I supect that you being a good conservative second amendment voting member of the Repulican persuausion would not want to associate with any of us liberal treehuggers to pick up trash and therefore have no alternative but to purchase them from me. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif


    Gun cleaning stand
     
  4. MarioT

    MarioT Well-Known Member

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    Dec 27, 2006
    Ok, well im going to contact my local Taxidermy and have them talk me through it or i'll go there. Also, I doubt i'll purchase that from you but i'll take a look /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif.
     
  5. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    All right now that we have finshed with the jokes I would mention a couple of points.

    If you think about it you will realize that when the gun is fired the copper jacketed bullet goes down the barrel followed by the burning powder. Thus the copper is laid down followed by carbon and this layering is repeated each time you shoot. The layering is not equal in all parts of the barrel. Most of the bullet squeezing to fit the bore is done in the first inch or so of the barrel and most of the powder burning is done in the same area. Thus it is my opinion that you clean with those two point in mind. The throat is dirtiest and it is layered. So I alternate cleaning solutions but do not mix them.

    Use a good new brush to clean the throat but run it all the way through to out the muzzle and then bring it back. These brass/bronze brushes wear out quickly so be prepared to buy a good supply.

    A Bore guide such as Stoney Point to keep your rod lined up and goo out of your action

    A high quality one piece rod for cleaning at home.

    A bottle of copper solvent cleaning fluid.

    A bottle of powder solvent cleaning fluid.

    Lots of brushes.

    Lots of patches.


    The other thing I do is to build one of Goodgrouper's anti spill devices. I take piece of a 2X4 and using a hole saw cut through it holes the size of my cleaning solvent bottles. I then take a piece of 1x6 or so and glue it on the bottom of the 2X4. This makes a little stand that holds my bottles upright and supports them so they don't fall over.
     
  6. Coyboy

    Coyboy Well-Known Member

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    Spades, I use the Dewey cleaning rods/jags/brushes, they are plastic coated steel, one piece rods. Very durable and will not harm your bore. I also use a bore guide, but I have settled on a cheap plastic product rather than the more expensive alluminum type.

    My solevent choice for copper is Barnes CR-10, and for carbon a 2-1 mix of Shooters Choice and Kroil.

    My cleaning course varys with the rifles degree of fouling/shots fired, and its bore condition.

    For regular cleanings when things aren't real bad I start with the SC/Kroil mix sending down a few soaked patches on the jag. If required I will send the brush down a half dozen times. I then send down a couple dry patches to remove the solevent. I will then go to the Barnes CR-10, If a couple soaked patches come out dark blue I will continue with the cr-10. Some experience is required here because your brass jag will turn your patches a very light blue. If you need to tell the difference send down a wet patch followed by a dry one, if the dry one shows streakes of dark blue you have a little more copper still in the bore.

    After I have finished with the cr-10 I send one more patch of SC/kroil down the bore to remove any of the remaining cr-10 residue. Dry patch, then a Kroil only patch, for rust prevention. Done

    If things are real bad it just takes longer. Once in a great while I will use the bronze brush with the cr-10 for really stuborn copper fouling. This will ruin your brush in
    short order, but is effective on the stuborn copper.
     
  7. MarioT

    MarioT Well-Known Member

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    Thanks a lot guys! I dont have time to read it at this moment but I will.

    P.S. I'm going turkey hunting next weekend (not with my rifle, obviously). So wish me luck!
     
  8. MarioT

    MarioT Well-Known Member

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    Alright, so I read. Its informational and it answers pretty much what I wanted. Thanks a lot guys. More questions might come around so i'll be sure to send one of you guys a pm or something since you are helpful and not bashing on noobies.

    Again, thanks a lot.

    Spades

    P.S. I will try and purchase the things you guys are talking about, most likely from the internet since I dont really have any LOCAL shops near me that carry them... from what I know. If any of you want to post any sites please feel free. Any help is acceptable /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif.
     
  9. 7mmSendaro

    7mmSendaro Well-Known Member

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    You should be able to get eveything you need from midwayusa.com. Good luck!
     
  10. MarioT

    MarioT Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Sendaro and good luck to you. Hopefully I get a turkey this weekend. I'm going out with my 10 Gauge Pardner Turkey Gun. It has a extra full choke so it has a nice tight pattern. Can't wait to use it.