help with the parallax setting on my scope.

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by newfoundlandhunter, Apr 30, 2014.

  1. newfoundlandhunter

    newfoundlandhunter New Member

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    i have recently bought a nikon prostaff 5 3.5-14x40 from my browning x-bolt long ranger hunter in 300wsm and it is the first scope i have ever owned one with an adjustable parallax setting on it, and i have no clue what to do with it, from my research on line i understand that most scope have the parallax set at 100 yards and you cant ajust it, and if i want to i can set the parallax knob to 100 yards and leave it and that will be sufficient for most hunting needs. but i never payed all that money for a long range rifle and scope and not to use all the features of it, so if someone can help me understand it and how to use it that would be great, thanks
     
  2. gohring3006

    gohring3006 Well-Known Member

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    GunWerks on YouTube has a short video on parralax adjustment its probably the best way to show you
     

  3. newfoundlandhunter

    newfoundlandhunter New Member

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    thanks i will take a look
     
  4. gohring3006

    gohring3006 Well-Known Member

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    there are two different spellings Gunwerks is the one you want
     
  5. gohring3006

    gohring3006 Well-Known Member

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    just realized Len has the parralax video from the video library in the longrange pursuit /gunwerks / g7
     
  6. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    Just adjust it back and forth until your target image is as clear as possible. If it has range marks on the dial they should be fairly close but don't count on them being at all precise.
     
  7. 4xforfun

    4xforfun Well-Known Member

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    Going to have to disagree....a little bit, anyway. I have seen scopes that the best focus and the correct paralex setting were off a bit. All were higher end scopes.

    Simply set the crosshair on the target with a steady rest and simply wiggle your head around. If the crosshair moves around off of the aim point, your will need to adjust the paralex knob till head movement will not move the crosshair off of the mothball. If the rest isn't steady enough, then simply find the best focus like Wildrose stated...the little bit that the paralex may be off is a moot point....your rest isn't steady enough for it to make a difference.

    Paralex and focus are two different things.

    Tod
     
  8. kcebcj

    kcebcj Well-Known Member

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    Agree with both. If really steady move your head a little if not just focus. The yardage numbers on the turret are so-so at best from my experence.
     
  9. AZShooter

    AZShooter Well-Known Member

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    When I shoot from the bench I do exactly what 4Xforfun suggests. If you are looking for a setting for generalized shooting such as a walk around jack rabbit or coyote hunting here is what has worked for me: I set the parallax at 150 yds and use the lower magnifications of 3.5 to 8. You won't notice any parallax issues causing misses at reasonable distances of 50 yds to perhaps 200. If you have a longer shot and want to crank up to max magnification then fine tune the parallax for the shot.
     
  10. 4xforfun

    4xforfun Well-Known Member

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    Just a note.....paralex is EXACTLY THE SAME no matter what power you have your scope set at. The reason it SEEMS less at the lowest power setting is because you can't see it on target as well with the power turned down. Just like mirage...turning the scope power down does not make for less mirage...you just can't see it as well.


    Tod
     
  11. AZShooter

    AZShooter Well-Known Member

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    I know that 4Xforfun...

    Leupold says that most of their non adjustable parallax scopes are set for 150 yds. I chose that setting decades ago with my AO Leupolds and have murdered many jackrabbits and coyotes out to 300 yds on the lower magnification settings.

    If you are trying to shoot a prairie dog in the eye at 250 yds you might need to adjust parallax perfectly. I was just trying to help the OP. Based on my field experience my tip will work.
     
  12. justgoto

    justgoto Well-Known Member

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    With my scope, the parallax is perfect when it is in focus; no matter what the distance. Maybe some scopes are a bit different, and you'll have to figure it out for yourself; but I focus mine, then take the shot.
     
  13. 4xforfun

    4xforfun Well-Known Member

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    Yep...I figured you knew, but you would be amazed at the number of good shooters out there think that paralex goes away at the lower powers just because you can't see it. I just put that post up just in case someone didn't know.

    I do the same thing as you do when I am in the field with my LR rig.....power down to 5.5 and paralex set at about 200. When ranges get "serious", or when I am at the bench (matches or just working up loads) I gotta do the head bob thing at the highest powers, even though I may end up dialing back the power for ???? reasons.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2014
  14. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    I think we're pretty much all saying the same thing in different ways. If you work it back and forth until the image is as crisp as possible with that scope, you're not going to see movement of the crosshairs by moving your head because it is focused correctly.

    That is unless something is very wrong with your scope or it's a cheap piece of junk not capable of proper parallax/focus adjustment.