differences between 338 Edge, 338 Ultra mag, 338 lapua??

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by cowboy717, Apr 19, 2008.

  1. cowboy717

    cowboy717 Well-Known Member

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    ok, i am new to the forum but been a reader for a while, i love long range shooting and have been interested in building an ultimate long range hunting rig, was leaning toward the 338 lapua, but high brass price and major fitting required for headspace size kinda turned me off of it for a while. now hearing about the edge and , never really thinking of the 338 ultra as a long range round until this. what are the major differences?? what are the case specs?
    thanks in advance
    Daric
     

  2. ol mike

    ol mike Well-Known Member

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    Ballistically -very little.

    Shawn Carlock is the father of the 338 edge ,he is a gunsmith and board member here.
    I believe the 338 edge is based on 300 rum case for it's longer neck and is ackley'd ,but like joe dirt says -that's just me talking over here..

    338 lapua brass is expensive for a reason = you get what you pay for !!!!-----ME
     

  3. Long Time Long Ranger

    Long Time Long Ranger Well-Known Member

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    Those three are good but not the ultimate. I have built a lot of those and own all of them. The Lapua is a little faster and gets you closer to the 338-378. It also requires more expense for the big bolt face and brass. The 338-300 ultramag that some people on here call the edge in my opinion is the best choice of the three when all is compared. I did 20-30 of these back when remington first gave out the specs on the 300 ultra. Chris Dichter over at Pac-Nor, who I did a lot of business with and was in continuous phone contact, got the specs at the shot show I believe and within a couple weeks he had me about 15 barrels to try by necking up the 300 ultra to 338. By the time the 300's were hitting the shelf we were testing a bunch of the 338-300's. Results were that it is inherently accurate, gives good velocity, and can be built fairly inexpensively because it uses the standard mag bolt face. I had to modify some magazine boxes and actions slightly because of the length but nothing major. I had a thousand yard range outside the shop and never will forget the first one I did. I bore sighted, fired two shots at 200 yards to put it where I wanted, then shot a 3 5/8" group at 750 yards. First shots out of a new rifle. This cartridge is very good and is probably your most inexpensive option if you have a magnum action. Shawn on here has done a lot of these and probably has this one figured out pretty good by now.

    Now, you said the ultimate. With all the research I have done to obtain the ultimate from a reasonable shoulder fired weapon considering currently available bullets for hunting I believe the chey-tac case modified and necked to 338 is the ultimate. Again a guy on here, Kirby Allen, does these. I have never talked to Kirby but I would imagine they would be expensive compared to the ultra's which are fairly easy to build. That action would cost you.

    Next in line I would say is the 416 and 378 necked to 338. You can put these on a wby mk5 action which is easy to get. Open up the bolt face if it isn't the 378 action and get a 378 magazine box. These will get you a good 250+ fps over the ultramag line. Again the brass is expensive but to me it is worth it because these are my go to rifles when I get serious. I have seven 338-378's, six 338-300 ultra's and two 338 Lapuas. That should give you an opinion of what is the best from a guy who has built and shot a lot of all of them. I am not a long range shooter, but a mid range shooter. I typically can stalk to within a half mile of my target so between a quarter and half mile is where I do most of my shooting. My 338-378's will average 3550 -3750 fps with a 200 grain nosler ballistic tip. Inside a half mile the ballistics are incredible and the results are devastating on game. Outside a half mile go with the 300 matchking. The 200's kick like a 25-06, the 300's about like a 300 mag. That translates to accuracy for a lot of people. For the price the 416 or the 378 necked to 338 is the best option. If you have a few hundred more dollars the chey-tac necked to 338 I think is the ultimate.

    The effect of a big 338 bullet on game at long range is devastating. It gives you a little room for error over the smaller calibers. In field conditions you may not always put that bullet exactly where you want. If you want to up the odds of your success use the 338 as minimum if you are a long range hunter. Shoot a lot at the range and see how many long range shots OFF THE BENCH would not be exactly through the chest. The big 338's will collect a lot of those animals. With smaller calibers you have a lot of wounding loss you don't want.
     
  4. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    Cowboy

    Check out the thread in Rifles, bullets,Barrelsand Balistics there is an on going
    thread on this subject by Rick Noland.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  5. JPRITT

    JPRITT Well-Known Member

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    Not to discredit Shawn. I respect the man, his accomplishments, and his rifles but calling him the fathter of the 338 edge is a bit of a strecth. Gunsmiths have been necking down the 404 jefferys for 30 years or more. Calling it an "Edge", yes I would give that credit to Shawn. Shawn, hope I didnt ruffle any feathers, just trying to be accurate.
     
  6. tippet

    tippet Member

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    Which Chey-Tac case is that? lol Forgive a newbie
     
  7. E.Precision

    E.Precision Active Member

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    I believe he is talking abot the 408 chey-tac cartridge. google it up, and find info on the cal and rifle

    Erik
     
  8. Shawn Carlock

    Shawn Carlock Sponsor

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    JPRITT,


    None taken. I have always claimed that I was not the first to neck a 300 RUM to 338. I did name it the 338 Edge mostly to avoid confusion about what could be chambered in it. I really did not want anyone to think that a 338 RUM and a 338-300 RUM were the same animal. While it is not the top fule dragster of the long range world, it is very high in the best bang for the buck catagory.
     
  9. Long Time Long Ranger

    Long Time Long Ranger Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for helping with that. Yes, I was talking about the original 408 cheyenne-tactical. I know a lot of people have modified it. And the other I mentioned is the big Rigby case that is a hummer improved and necked to 338. I do not claim to be an expert and am not a professional gunsmith and never would claim to be. I have built a lot of rifles over a lot of years as a hobby. I was just giving an opinion on here like everybody else. Some beginners may gain something from what I know and if you experienced guys catch me saying something stupid just correct me. If it is just opinion you don't agree with me on then just wait till the next thread and we will probably agree on it.
     
  10. cowboy717

    cowboy717 Well-Known Member

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    decision made

    i think from reading around on this site i have decided on building a 338 edge. it seems the lapua is just a lil too expensive to reload for, and for ease of reloading the 338 sounds just right. what should i start looking for???
    thanks
    gun)
    Daric
     
  11. sniperVLS

    sniperVLS Well-Known Member

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    Mr. Carlocks email :)
     
  12. jwp475

    jwp475 Well-Known Member

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    How is a Laupa any more expensive to reload for than an Edge? The same powder and bullets, capacity is probably a few grains more with the Edge.
     
  13. bwaites

    bwaites Well-Known Member

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    Lapua brass vs. Remington brass.

    Lapua is much more costly in initial outlay.

    At these pressures, I have no idea how each will hold up.

    In my 6.5 Grendel, the Lapua brass has been good for 10+ reloadings, but I doubt you can count on that here!

    Bill
     
  14. jwp475

    jwp475 Well-Known Member

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    Yes Laupa brass costs more intialy, but tends to last longer and there is less discarded because of inconsistence issues. IMHO this offsets the intial cost...